05/29/2016

PECOS HANK - Ultimate Tornado Compilation: DIVINE CONCEPTION!

 

Published on May 28, 2016

Unbelievable swirling clouds appear to be fertilized by a tornado. This violent, long track tornado packed EF4 tornado force winds over open Kansas country South of Dodge City. This beautiful tornado took on many different shapes during its 20 minute life (current estimation). For licensing 4K footage contact hankschyma@yahoo.com

Video Credit: Pecos Hank

 

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

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Lightning in Slow Motion

Check out this incredible video of lightning in slow motion. The scientists at the Florida Institute of Technology used a high-speed camera to capture these amazing flashes. The camera is able to take 7000 frames per second in order to detect all the different types of lightning strikes that we normally are unable to see.   The scientists hope this technology will help them learn more about lightning. 

Take a look at it below! 

 

Video Courtesy: SciNews

How is Memorial Day looking? Find out tonight on WDRB News with Jeremy! He will tell you when our next chance for rain will be and if it will impact your plans. 

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 -Meteorologist Katie McGraw

 

05/28/2016

Looking Back 20 Years at Violent Tornado

Although it has been 20 years, residents living in Jefferson, Bullitt and Spencer Counties on May 28, 1996 will always remember the F4 tornado that tore through the area and destroyed everything in its path.

May 28 th tornado
The tornado roared on for 30 miles and was a 1/2 mile wide. It caused over $100,000,000 in damages, including 1,000 homes and it left 10 injured. Thankfully, no one was killed, which the National Weather Service credits  to effective warnings and quick public action. 

After some digging, I found WDRB footage of the storm in our archives. These videos were taken in Pioneer Village, which was right in the path of the F4 tornado. 

 

This is also a radar loop of the tornado. 

  

 Video Courtesy: Legend813a

 The National Weather Service says, it all started when a powerful thunderstorm developed over southwestern Dubois County, Indiana, and headed east. As it moved toward Crawford County, the storm split into two separate entities, with one moving to the northeast and the other to the southeast. Both storms produced large hail, but it was the southern, “right-moving” storm that brought significant destruction to the area.

After producing a tornado of F2 strength along a 10 mile path in Harrison County, Indiana, the supercell storm crossed the Ohio River into Kentucky.

After dropping hail the size of quarters around Valley Station, Kentucky, a new tornado quickly formed over Jefferson Memorial Forest, cutting a wide gash through the woods. The tornado quickly gained strength and charged across Bullitt County, bringing great destruction to Brooks, Hillview, and Mount Washington. Witnesses reported multiple vortices swirling around the tornado, and suffered F3-F4 damage to their homes and businesses.

Exhibiting a classic “hook echo” on National Weather Service Doppler radar, the twister then churned across Spencer County, producing F3 damage, before dissipating east of Taylorsville. 

May 28th damage

Tell me about your experience from 20 years ago on my Facebook or Twitter page. I would love to hear your story. Find me with the links below. 

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 -Meteorologist Katie McGraw

05/27/2016

2016 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook...

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center says the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through November 30, will most likely be near-normal, but forecast uncertainty in the climate signals that influence the formation of Atlantic storms make predicting this season particularly difficult.

PHOTO-Hurricane-Joaquin-NOAA-100115-1120x534-landscape

NOAA predicts a 70 percent likelihood of 10 to 16 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 4 to 8 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 4 major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher). While a near-normal season is most likely with a 45 percent chance, there is also a 30 percent chance of an above-normal season and a 25 percent chance of a below-normal season. Included in today’s outlook is Hurricane Alex, a pre-season storm that formed over the far eastern Atlantic in January.

“This is a more challenging hurricane season outlook than most because it’s difficult to determine whether there will be reinforcing or competing climate influences on tropical storm development,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. "However, a near-normal prediction for this season suggests we could see more hurricane activity than we’ve seen in the last three years, which were below normal.”

 

Video Courtesy: NOAA

Bell explained there is uncertainty about whether the high activity era of Atlantic hurricanes, which began in 1995, has ended. This high-activity era has been associated with an ocean temperature pattern called the warm phase of the Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation or AMO, marked by warmer Atlantic Ocean temperatures and a stronger West African monsoon. However, during the last three years weaker hurricane seasons have been accompanied by a shift toward the cool AMO phase, marked by cooler Atlantic Ocean temperatures and a weaker West African monsoon. If this shift proves to be more than short-lived, it could usher in a low-activity era for Atlantic hurricanes, and this period may already have begun. High- and low-activity eras typically last 25 to 40 years.

In addition, El Niño is dissipating and NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a 70 percent chance that La Niña — which favors more hurricane activity — will be present during the peak months of hurricane season, August through October. However, current model predictions show uncertainty as to how strong La Niña and its impacts will be.

INFOGRAPHIC-2016-atlantic-hurricane-season-outlook-NOAA-052416-1920x1080-original

Despite the challenging seasonal prediction, NOAA is poised to deliver actionable environmental intelligence during the hurricane season with more accuracy to help save lives and livelihoods and enhance the national economy as we continue building a Weather-Ready Nation.

“This is a banner year for NOAA and the National Weather Service — As our Hurricane Forecast Improvement Programoffsite link turns five, we’re on target with our five-year goal to improve track and intensity forecasts by 20 percent each,” said NOAA Administrator Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D. “Building on a successful supercomputer upgrade in January, we’re adding unprecedented new capabilities to our hurricane forecast models — investing in science and technology infusion to bring more accuracy to hurricane forecasts in 2016.”

Coming online later this season are major new investments to further improve NOAA’s ability to monitor hurricanes as they form and provide more timely and accurate warnings for their impacts. NOAA’s new National Water Model — set to launch later this summer — will provide hourly water forecasts for 700 times more locations than our current flood forecast system, greatly enhancing our ability to forecast inland flooding from tropical systems. In the fall, NOAA will launch GOES-R, a next generation weather satellite that will scan the Earth five times faster, with a resolution four times greater than ever before, to produce much sharper images of hurricanes and other severe weather.

NOAA works with a number of partners in the private and public sectors to ensure communities and businesses have the information they need to act well ahead of a land-falling hurricane.

“While seasonal forecasts may vary from year to year — some high, some low — it only takes one storm to significantly disrupt your life,” stated FEMA Deputy Administrator Joseph Nimmich.  “Preparing for the worst can keep you, your family, and first responders out of harm’s way. Take steps today to be prepared: develop a family communications plan, build an emergency supply kit for your home, and make sure you and your family know your evacuation route. These small steps can help save your life when disaster strikes.”

NOAA will issue an updated outlook for the Atlantic hurricane season in early August, just prior to the peak of the season.

INFOGRAPHIC-2016-atlantic-hurricane-season-cyclone-names-NOAA-052416-1920x1080-original

NOAA also issued its outlook for the eastern Pacific and central Pacific basins. The central Pacific hurricane outlook calls for equal 40 percent chance of a near-normal or above-normal season with 4-7 tropical cyclones likely. The eastern Pacific hurricane outlook calls for a 40 percent chance of a near-normal hurricane season, a 30 percent chance of an above-normal season and a 30 percent chance of a below-normal season. That outlook calls for a 70 percent probability of 13-20 named storms, of which 6-11 are expected to become hurricanes, including 3-6 major hurricanes.

 

-Rick DeLuca

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05/26/2016

Giant Sinkhole Swallows 20 Cars in Italy...

A giant sinkhole opened up in Florence, Italy yesterday, swallowing about 20 cars parked near the iconic Ponte Vecchio bridge. At first, many thought the river was to blame, but after further investigation they discovered an old underground pipe burst. It measured an astonishing 650 feet in length, and 23 feet across! Thankfully, no injuries were reported, but two buildings in the surrounding area were evacuated. Check out the video...

 

Video Courtesy: RT

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

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A Severe Thunderstorm Watch May Be Issued

The Storm Prediction Center is monitoring our region, particularly to the SW, for potentially severe weather and are preparing to issue a watch if deemed necessary.  It is a day to remain weather aware! Our main threats will be gusty winds and hail. 

See what they had to say about the storms below. 

5-26 mcd

 PROBABILITY OF WATCH ISSUANCE...40 PERCENT

   SUMMARY...IT IS NOT CERTAIN THAT A WATCH IS NEEDED...BUT TRENDS ARE
   BEING MONITORED FOR THE POSSIBILITY OF INCREASING SEVERE WEATHER
   POTENTIAL WHICH COULD REQUIRE A WATCH THIS AFTERNOON.

   DISCUSSION...SUBSTANTIAL BOUNDARY LAYER DESTABILIZATION HAS TAKEN
   PLACE ON THE SOUTHERN FLANK OF THE CONGLOMERATE OUTFLOW BOUNDARY
   ADVANCING SOUTHEASTWARD THROUGH PORTIONS OF THE LOWER OHIO/MIDDLE
   MISSISSIPPI VALLEYS.  PERHAPS AIDED BY AN AREA OF ENHANCED LOWER/MID
   TROPOSPHERIC WARM ADVECTION...CONVECTION APPEARS TO BE GROWING
   UPSCALE IN A CLUSTER NOW SOUTHEAST OF CAPE GIRARDEAU.  

   LOW-LEVEL AND DEEP LAYER MEAN FLOW/SHEAR ACROSS MUCH OF THIS REGION
   IS RATHER MODEST TO WEAK.  BUT INTERACTION BETWEEN THE GROWING
   CLUSTER OF STORMS AND A SLOW MOVING OR STALLED SEGMENT OF THE
   OUTFLOW APPEARS TO BE INCREASING.  AS THIS...AND INFLOW OF AIR
   CHARACTERIZED BY MIXED LAYER OF 1500-3000 J/KG...CONTINUES...THE
   EVOLUTION OF AN ORGANIZED MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEM APPEARS
   POSSIBLE.  IF THIS OCCURS...IT PROBABLY WILL BE ACCOMPANIED BY AT
   LEAST SOME RISK FOR POTENTIAL DAMAGING...PERHAPS SEVERE...WIND
   GUSTS.
 

Mark and Rick will have their analysis of the storms tonight on WDRB. Be sure to tune in to find out when the threat will diminish and if there is more severe weather in our future. If storms become severe the whole weather team will be keeping you informed on social media! Stay safe! 

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 -Meteorologist Katie McGraw

 

Strong Storms This Afternoon

From Jude Redfield...

    A few strong storms will approach Kentuckiana this afternoon. These storms are outrunning the main energy source in the Great Plains so our risk for severe weather remains limited. The main threats come in the form of blinding downpours, frequent lightning and wind gusts to 40mph. 

ColdBlast

    The Storm Prediction Center has an area highlighted below that should expect a few strong storms during our lunch hour. *They have no plans on issuing a Severe T-Storm Watch at this point according to their latest discussion*

RadarHelp

    I would expect the best chance for storms in our region between 1pm - 6pm.  Scattered strong storms are likely with isolated severe storms possible. Make sure to check in with Katie, Marc & Rick through out the afternoon as they will provide radar updates on social media. -Jude Redfield-

05/25/2016

Watch LIVE Streaming Video from the Heart of Tornado Alley!

A Tornado Watch has been issued for parts of Central Kansas and Storm Chaser Brandon Sullivan is LIVE streaming from the Sunflower State...

 

 

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

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Intense Tornadoes Tear Through The Plains

It was quite the severe weather day in the plains yesterday. According to the Storm Prediction Center, there were 37 tornadoes reported yesterday, most of which occurred from South Dakota to Oklahoma.

5-25 spc
A day later, there are several videos of these tornadoes circling the internet. It is amazing to see the size and strength of these powerful storms. This one below is really terrifying. It shows a tornado destroying a house or barn. It was taken by a tornado chaser.

Video Courtesy: NEWS Daily

This is just one of many videos of the storms. Click here if you want to see more videos of tornadoes from yesterday. Closer to home, we have a lot of storm chances over the next few days and we are keeping an eye on the threat for severe weather. Join Marc and Rick this evening to learn more about your forecast! 

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 -Meteorologist Katie McGraw

05/24/2016

NHC: 30% Chance Of Subtropical Or Tropical Development Off Southeast Coast...

The Atlantic hurricane season officially starts June 1, but the weather doesn't always play by the rules. A cluster of storms near the Bahamas may intensify and approach the Southeast coast during Memorial Day weekend. A special tropical weather outlook from The National Hurricane Center was issued today saying there's a 30% chance of subtropical or tropical development off the Southeast coast in the next five days. Here's the info...

Two_atl_2d0

Image Credit: NOAA

 

SPECIAL TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
335 PM EDT TUE MAY 24 2016

For the North Atlantic...Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico:

1. An area of showers and thunderstorms over the western Atlantic Ocean
near and northeast of the Bahamas is associated with the
interaction of an upper-level trough and a weakening cold front.
While development is not expected for the next couple of days,
environmental conditions could become more conducive for some
tropical or subtropical development by Friday. This area of
disturbed weather is expected to move slowly west-northwestward or
northwestward and gradually approach the southeastern United
States over the next few days. The next Special Tropical Weather
Outlook will be issued by 4 PM EDT Wednesday.
* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...near 0 percent
* Formation chance through 5 days...low...30 percent

The reason conditions are NOT favorable over the next 48 hours is the presence of strong winds aloft. You can see the jet stream energy off the coast on this 250mb chart...

1

A few days from now, the winds weaken significantly which would allow storms to organize...

2

There's still lots of uncertainty, but IF this system materializes, it will be given the name Bonnie. The 2016 Atlantic Hurricane Season had a rare January hurricane named Alex that impacted the Azores. Either way, rain and rough surf is looking more likely along the Southeast coast this holiday weekend. We will keep you posted in the coming days.

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

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