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58 posts from June 2017

06/30/2017

AIR QUALITY ALERT: Which Days To Limit Outdoor Activities...

..AIR QUALITY ALERT IN EFFECT FROM 8 AM SUNDAY TO MIDNIGHT EDT
MONDAY NIGHT...

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The Louisville Metro Air Pollution Control District and the Indiana
Department of Environmental Management have issued an Air Quality
Alert...in effect from 8 AM Sunday to midnight EDT Monday night.

A Code Orange Air Quality Alert for Ozone has been issued for the
Louisville Metro Area. Members of sensitive groups may experience
health effects. The general public is not likely to be affected.
Sensitive groups include the elderly...children...persons with asthma
or other breathing problems...and persons with lung and heart
disease. People in these groups are advised to limit their outdoor
activities to reduce their exposure to ozone and particulate
pollution.

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-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

06/29/2017

STORMY START TO HOLIDAY WEEKEND: Timing & Threats...

Many of you are looking forward to a long holiday weekend, but it may start off rather stormy. Before you decide to mentally check out, it's important that you know storms could impact outdoor plans. In this blog, I want to focus specifically on what to expect for Friday. As the day wears on, heat and humidity could fuel strong to severe storms. According to the GFS, there looks to be around 2,000 units of CAPE (Convective Available Potential Energy) late in the day. That's more than enough instability for storms to feed on... 

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There's also a sufficient amount of wind energy to support the formation of organized storms. Damaging winds, hail, lightning, and heavy rain are the main threats. The winds don't change much with height, so while the possibility of a tornado isn't 0%, it's very low. Now let's talk about the timing. I hate you give you such a wide window, but we need to be on guard for storms from 6 pm Friday - 2 am Saturday...

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Scattered storms are possible for parts of the area on Saturday as well. Before you cancel any plans, I want to let you know that there will be a bunch of dry time as well. Marc and I will be talking about the locations at risk and what you need to know for the rest of the 4th of July Weekend on WDRB News at 10 and 11pm! 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

FACE OF JUPITER: Do you see it?

JunoCam images aren’t just for art and science – sometimes they are processed to bring a chuckle. This image, processed by citizen scientist Jason Major, is titled “Jovey McJupiterface.” By rotating the image 180 degrees and orienting it from south up, two white oval storms turn into eyeballs and the Great Red Spot looks like a mouth, revealing the “face” of Jupiter!

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Image Credit: NASA

The original image was acquired by JunoCam on NASA’s Juno spacecraft on May 19, 2017 at 11:20 a.m. PT (2: 20 p.m. ET) from an altitude of 12,075 miles (19,433 kilometers).

JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at:

www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

06/28/2017

BRAIN HEAD FIRE: Smoke Seen From Space...

Flames devoured more than 50,000 acres of Utah conifers in the final week of June 2017. A wildfire, likely started by people, spread across the landscape of mixed conifers, feeding on dry trees that had succumbed to earlier beetle infestation.

More than 1,600 firefighters had been deployed to the scene, according to reporting by The Salt Lake Tribune. Rough terrain slowed the fire’s progress, the paper reported. However, a spate of hot weather lent itself to faster burning.

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Image Credit: NASA

NASA’s Aqua satellite collected this natural-color image with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on June 24, 2017, a week after the blaze began. Actively burning areas, detected by MODIS’s thermal bands, are outlined in red.

Officials expect the fire to continue to push northeast. As the fire spreads, it will feed off of shrubs instead of taller trees according to InciWeb, a group that monitors fires in the U.S. According to the organization, “conditions tomorrow could produce extreme fire behavior with crowning, long range spotting and group torching.”

 

Video Credit: NWSSaltLakeCity

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

Back to Summer: Fuel for Storms

Since Saturday we have seen below average temperatures and dew points have been very comfortable! It has been pleasant but we are beginning to warm back up! I'm sure you have noticed a change in the past day. Temps have increased a lot in the past 24 hours. 

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Even though temps are warmer today, the dew point is still pretty low today. It is considered comfortable on our muggy meter. However, by tomorrow that will change. The dew points will sky rocket and quickly. We will bypass the humid category and head straight to steamy. It will be miserably muggy by Friday. 

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The increase of heat and humidity will be the fuel for showers and storms. They will return slowly by tomorrow, but they become much more likely by Friday. 

We will start to see a few more clouds tomorrow and notice below that there will be a few stray, hit or miss showers and storms during the afternoon tomorrow. Use the images of Advancetrak below as a gauge of coverage, rather than EXACTLY where showers and storms will fire off. 

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At 2

At 3

At 4

Rain chances will diminish by Thursday night and Friday will start off dry.

However, notice that later in the day on Friday, there is a better chance for rain. The timing is still a bit in the air, but majority of the models show most of the activity to be late on Friday and into Saturday. 

At 5

We will be continuing to pin point the timing of the rain over the next few days. Be sure to join Rick and Marc this evening to hear their thoughts and any changes with the data. 

Let's connect! The links to my social media pages are below. 

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06/27/2017

LOOKING BACK: The Ohio Valley / Mid-Atlantic Derecho of June 2012...

While not the most intense or long-lived event ever observed, the June 29, 2012 Ohio Valley / Mid-Atlantic Derecho was noteworthy in producing the all-time highest recorded June or July wind gusts at several official observing sites along its path (Fort Wayne, Indiana, Zanesville, Ohio, and Huntington, West Virginia), in addition to widespread, significant wind damage. Five million people lost power from Chicago to the mid-Atlantic Coast, and 22 people were killed. The storm also was notable for being arguably the first derecho to capture widespread media attention, striking as it did nearly every metropolitan area in a broadening path that extended from Chicago and Indianapolis to Baltimore, Washington, and Tidewater Virginia (Figures 1 and 2).

12jun29_rpts_svrplot

Figure 1. Area affected (black contours) and storm reports (colored symbols) associated with the June 29, 2012 derecho. Reports are for the 24-hour period from 7:00 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) Friday, June 29 to 7:00 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) Saturday, June 30. Areal outline dashed in Iowa and Illinois to reflect the derecho's origin from convection in that region that did not immediately produce continuous derecho-like conditions. In addition, some of the reports in those states occurred not with the system here discussed, but rather with a subsequent storm complex that formed on the evening of June 29 (see Figures 3, 4, and 5). The areal outline also is dashed in North Carolina to reflect that many of the damaging wind gusts in that state occurred south of the thunderstorms that produced them. Storm reports depicted as follows: Wind damage or wind gusts ≥ 50 kts (58 mph), small blue squares; estimated or measured wind gusts ≥ 65 kts (74 mph), large black squares with yellow centers; hail ≥ 0.75 inches, small green squares; hail ≥ 2.0 inches, large green triangles; tornadoes, small red squares.

12jun29_composite

Figure 2. Composite display of hourly radar reflectivity imagery, showing development and evolution of the June 29, 2012 derecho-producing convective system, with selected observed wind gusts (italics, mph). Time is EDT, and ranges from 2 p.m. Friday, June 29 (1800 UTC June 29; far left) to 12:00 midnight Friday-Saturday, June 29-30 (0400 UTC June 30; far right). The derecho moved approximately 700 miles in twelve hours, yielding an average motion of nearly 60 mph. (Modified from base image by G. Carbin, NOAA Storm Prediction Center)

 

 

As with a sizable percentage of warm-season events, the parent convective system associated with the Ohio Valley / Mid-Atlantic derecho arose from elevated thunderstorms; that is, storms that formed in a layer of unstable air located above a frontal surface. In this case, the storms formed during the early morning (CDT) of Friday, 29 June over eastern Iowa, where a modest band of moist, southwesterly low-level winds (known as the "nocturnal low level jet") intersected a weak stationary front. The front extended east into central Ohio and southern Pennsylvania, and served, in part, as a guide along which the derecho would move later in the day. The boundary separated hot, very humid air (with afternoon temperatures near 100 °F and surface dewpoints around 70 °F) from slightly cooler and drier air to the north (Figure 3).

Despite the absence of an upper level (or "jet stream") disturbance to encourage development, the Iowa thunderstorms grew and developed east into northern Illinois through the remainder of the morning as the moist southwesterly flow continued to impinge on the front. Storm development and intensity were enhanced by the presence of a deep "elevated mixed layer," or EML, across the region (see Derechos and Heat Waves). The EML extended all the way from the Rockies and northern Plains through the mid-Mississippi and Ohio Valleys to the mid-Atlantic coast --- well beyond its usual range over the Plains. The eastward extension of the EML reflected the presence of persistent, deep westerly flow on the north side of a stationary high pressure area centered over the southern states. The high was responsible for a protracted heat wave that gripped the southern Plains, Ohio Valley, and Southeast in the days prior to the 29 June derecho. On the 29th, several sites, including Charlotte, Nashville, and Raleigh tied or set all-time June maximum temperature records (with readings of 104, 109, and 105 (°F), respectively). In Washington, D.C., the maximum of 104 was the hottest ever observed in June in 142 years of record. (For more on the general the relationship between derechos and heat waves, see Derechos and Heat Waves).

The Iowa and Illinois storms produced scattered instances of severe hail and damaging wind, including 60 mph gusts near Chicago, but were not otherwise noteworthy. By early afternoon, however, the convection strengthened as it moved into northern Indiana. While these thunderstorms likely were still slightly elevated above the frontal surface, they nevertheless began to "bow" downstream toward Fort Wayne, producing swaths of 60-70 mph winds that toppled numerous trees and power lines. Around the same time, new storms began to form farther south across central Indiana as surface heating destabilized the region along the stalled front and allowed the EML "cap" (or "lid") to be breached (Figure 3).


Figure 3. Fourteen-hour visible data satellite loop showing the development and evolution of the June 29, 2012 derecho-producing convective system, and of smaller convective system that subsequently formed over Iowa and Illinois (responsible for some of the severe weather reports in that region plotted in Figure 1). "Ping-pong" animation begins at 6:25 a.m. CDT (1125 UTC) June 29 and ends at 9:10 p.m. EDT June 29 (0110 UTC June 30). Surface data also shown, using conventional format with standard three-letter station identifiers (temperature / dew point (°F) on left, pressure / pressure tendency (mb) on right; white lines / barbs depict wind direction and speed (knots; one full barb = 10 knots = 11.5 mph)). Return leg of loop pauses at 2:15 p.m. EDT (1815 UTC), shortly before storms evolved into a derecho-producing convective system. This is to highlight concentrated area of convective overturning that is about to occur over central and eastern Indiana as outflow boundary from northern Indiana bow encounters field of rapidly growing cumulus congestus clouds (speckled area) in central Indiana and western Ohio. Such concentrated, nearly simultaneous, deep convective development often immediately precedes derechos that occur in the absence of strong, large-scale forcing for ascent (i.e., in the absence of an obvious jet stream disturbance).

 

 

The combination of hot, very humid air at the surface with temperatures that decreased rapidly with height ("steep lapse rates") in the overlying EML fostered vigorous storm updrafts. As a result, the convection expanded rapidly east along the front to join the strengthening bow as the latter feature entered Ohio from northeast Indiana. By 4 p.m. (EDT), this concentrated release of great thermodynamic instability yielded an intense squall line that arced from south of Toledo, Ohio through the Dayton area to near Indianapolis. Scattered 80 mph gusts in the evolving derecho not only downed countless trees and power lines, but also blew roofs off homes, businesses, and schools, and overturned tractor-trailers. Several people were injured by falling trees and wind-blown debris. A measured 91 mph gust at Fort Wayne was the strongest wind gust ever observed at that first-order observing site during June and July in 61 years of record.

The derecho-producing squall line accelerated east-southeast across central and southern Ohio through the remainder of the afternoon and early evening, reaching northern Kentucky and western West Virginia by 7:00 p.m. It was over the southern half of Ohio that the storm system attained its greatest organization and strength (Figure 4). Tree damage became widespread as the swath of high winds broadened and became nearly continuous, with numerous measured severe gusts observed. An all-time June-July record wind gust of 63 mph was recorded at Zanesville. Structural damage prompted the closing of a shopping mall in Dayton, and a 70-year-old woman was crushed by a collapsing barn near Zanesville. In neighboring Kentucky, a falling tree killed a man in Clark County (east of Lexington).

During this period, the apex of the system's larger-scale bow tracked east-southeast along the aforementioned stationary front over central Ohio with an average speed of more than 65 mph (Figure 4). The motion of the bow apex along the front appeared, in part, to reflect augmentation of the bow by its absorption of thunderstorms that formed ahead of it along the boundary. Similar behavior has been observed with less notable bowing convective systems. The bow's link with the boundary also reflected the change in the direction and speed of cell advection and propagation that existed from north to south across the boundary. Relatively fast eastward propagation was favored north of the front, with slower south or southeastward development to its south.

Figure 4. Eighteen-hour composite radar base reflectivity loop showing development and evolution of the June 29, 2012 derecho-producing convective system, and of smaller convective system that subsequently formed over Iowa and Illinois. "Ping-pong" animation begins at 7:15 a.m. CDT Friday, June 29 (1215 UTC June 29) and ends at 2:40 a.m. EDT (0640 UTC) Saturday, June 30. Reflectivity intensity scale at left (dBZ). Surface data plotted using conventional format, as in Figure 3.

 

The derecho raced east across the mountains of West Virginia, western Virginia, far southwest Pennsylvania, and western Maryland during mid-evening, where widespread destruction continued --- mainly to trees. Several people were killed or injured as trees fell onto vehicles and homes. Although radar reflectivity data suggest that the storms slightly weakened during this period, (Figure 4) they remained efficient wind producers. Wind damage occurred even along the far southern fringe of the squall line, where little or no cloud-to-ground lightning was observed.

The convective system regained strength as it continued east and southeast of the Appalachians into central Virginia, northern North Carolina, the District of Columbia, and central Maryland later in the evening (Figure 5). The north-south damage swath widened to nearly 300 miles, and more than dozen people were killed or seriously injured by falling trees. The derecho's effects were particularly acute in suburban Washington and Baltimore, where measured 65-75 mph gusts severed numerous overhead electrical feeders. Two people were electrocuted by downed power lines, and more than two million customers lost power. Power in some areas took nearly a week to be restored. In addition, communication disruptions were widespread. Near Washington, D.C., loss of power to a key communications facility interrupted 911 service in northern Virginia. Other communication issues involved the loss of both land line and cellular telephone service, and scattered internet outages in the private, government, and commercial sectors. Some of these problems persisted for several days.

Figure 5. Sterling, Virginia (near Dulles Airport) radar reflectivity (left) and velocity (right) animations from 8:57 p.m. to 11:35 p.m. EDT June 29 (0057 - 0335 UTC June 30) as the derecho moved from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Chesapeake Bay. Small, dark circle in both loops marks the radar site west of Washington, D.C. Reflectivity (dBZ) and velocity (knots) scales shown near top of each loop.

In the velocity display, cyan and green shades represent strong inbound winds; bright oranges and reds, strong outbound flow. The loop well illustrates the veritable "wall of wind" associated with a strong derecho. However, while the apex of the large scale bow echo did indeed cross Washington, D.C., the apparent drop-off in wind speeds north and south of the city is exaggerated by the fact that Doppler radar can only detect the component of the wind blowing directly toward or away from the radar. (Base data courtesy of R. Grumm, NWS State College, Pennsylvania).

 

By midnight EDT, the squall line extended in a broad arc from northeast of Baltimore to the Virginia-North Carolina border northeast of Raleigh. Some of the damaging wind gusts observed in North Carolina occurred south of the parent thunderstorms that produced them, attesting to the intensity and concentration of storm downdrafts near the Virginia-North Carolina border. Wind damage continued as the convective system moved east across the Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula early Saturday morning (30 June). Several measured gusts in the 60-70 mph range were reported in Tidewater Virginia and Delaware.

The northern end of the storm system strengthened as it moved into southern New Jersey. This appeared to occur as a larger scale circulation (a mesoscale convective vortex, or MCV), evolved near the intersection of the squall line and the remnant stationary front. The development of the MCV may, in part, have been related to a localized burst of intense convection near Baltimore (apparent toward end of animation shown in Figure 5) that was accompanied by a notable increase in cloud-to-ground lightning. The storms in this part of the convective system produced continuous damage that extended east across Delaware Bay to Atlantic City, where a 74 mph gust was reported. Two children were killed at Parvin State Park in Salem County, New Jersey when a tree fell across their camping tent. The derecho-producing system finally weakened upon encountering cooler, maritime air off the Delaware and New Jersey coast around 2 a.m. Saturday (Figure 6).

Figure 6. Twenty-two-hour infrared data satellite loop showing the development, evolution, and demise of the June 29, 2012 derecho-producing convective system, and of smaller convective system that subsequently formed over Iowa and Illinois. "Ping-pong" animation begins at 6:30 a.m. CDT (1130 UTC) June 29 and ends at 5:15 a.m. EDT June 30 (0915 UTC June 30). Color enhancement scale not shown, but cloud tops colder than -65 °C appear black (approximately 14 km or 46,000 ft), -70 °C, gold (approximately 15 km or 50,000 ft), and -75 °C, aqua (approximately 16 km, or 53,000 ft). Loop pauses on selected frames that display 1200 UTC June 29 and 0000 UTC June 30 500 mb radiosonde data (using conventional station plot format, similar to that in Figure 3, with height in decameters).

 

 

 

The Ohio Valley / Mid-Atlantic derecho serves as a reminder that, when conditions are favorable --- in particular, when the Plains elevated mixed layer extends well beyond its normal range --- significant, forward-propagating convective systems may move all the way to the East Coast. The Appalachian Mountains frequently are cited as having a deleterious impact on convective systems moving into the Mid-Atlantic states from the Midwest. It is true that terrain effects can negatively impact the low level wind and buoyancy patterns that govern system propagation. But the primary reason many Midwest storm systems weaken upon reaching the Appalachians is that, on average, that is where they encounter the eastern extent of the EML. In fact, it could be argued that the Appalachians enhanced the 29 June 2012 event, as downslope flow within the convective system cold pool augmented low level ascent along the gust front east of the mountains, enabling viable cell propagation to continue well into the night. While such events are uncommon, they are by no means unprecedented.

In summary, the Ohio Valley / Mid-Atlantic Derecho of June 2012 traveled approximately 700 miles in twelve hours, with an average forward speed of nearly 60 mph. The storm inflicted untold damage and hardship along a heavily populated corridor through the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states. Nearly two dozen people lost their lives, and many more were seriously injured. Many thousands suffered without power for days in the life-threatening heat wave that persisted after the storm. The storm's impact, particularly on the Nation's Capital, garnered widespread media attention. For the first time, perhaps, the word "derecho" was front-page news. The event, however, was not well forecast. The derecho illustrated that widespread, significant weather conditions can, on occasion, occur in the absence of strong atmospheric disturbances (see Derecho Forecasting). The storm also once again drew attention to the vulnerablity of suburban areas to derecho winds due to their enhanced exposure to tree and utility line damage (see, in Casualty and Damage Risks, "Special hazards posed by derechos in urban areas").

 

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

06/26/2017

HURRICANE DORA: Eastern Pacific Tropical Update...

The fourth tropical cyclone of the Eastern Pacific Ocean season formed on June 25 and by June 26 it was already a hurricane. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Dora on June 25 when it was a tropical storm and the next day it became the first hurricane of the season.  

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On June 25, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Dora in the Eastern Pacific.
Credits: NASA/NOAA
 

Tropical Depression Dora developed around 11 p.m. EDT on Saturday, June 24 about 180 miles (290 km) south of Acapulco, Mexico. By 5 a.m. EDT on June 25, the depression had strengthened into a tropical storm and was named Dora.

At 19:36 UTC (3:36 p.m. EDT), the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible-light image of the storm. The VIIRS imagery showed well-defined convective spiral bands of thunderstorms with a developing central dense overcast or CDO cloud feature.

Seven and a half hours later, Dora showed signs of better organization. At 11 p.m. EDT, the National Hurricane Center or NHC noted "Dora's cloud pattern has continued to quickly improve this evening. Several well-defined spiral bands wrap around the center and the CDO has become more symmetric and expanded since the previous advisory." 

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Image Credit: NOAA

At 5 a.m. EDT on Monday, June 26, Dora became the first hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season. Satellite data indicate that maximum sustained winds have increased to near 80 mph (130 kph) with higher gusts. 

The NHC said the eye of Hurricane Dora was located near latitude 16.7 degrees North and longitude 105.3 degrees West. That's about 170 miles (275 km) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Dora was moving toward the west-northwest near 13 mph (20 kph), and the NHC forecast said that general motion with some decrease in forward speed is expected over the next 48 hours. On the forecast track, the center of Dora is expected to remain offshore of the coast of southwestern Mexico.

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

FOREST FIRES: Reason Behind Recent Wildfires In Alaska & Canada...

A new NASA-funded study finds that lightning storms were the main driver of recent massive fire years in Alaska and northern Canada. The study, led by Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the University of California, Irvine, examined the cause of the fires, which have been increasing in number in recent years. There was a record number of lightning-ignited fires in the Canadian Northwest Territories in 2014 and in Alaska in 2015. The team found increases of between two and five percent a year in the number of lightning-ignited fires since 1975.

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A lightning-caused wildfire burns in Alberta, Canada. Credits: The Government of Alberta

To study the fires, the team analyzed data from NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites and from ground-based lightning networks.

Lead author Sander Veraverbeke of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, who conducted the work while at UC Irvine, said that while the drivers of large fire years in the high north are still poorly understood, the observed trends are consistent with climate change.

“We found that it is not just a matter of more burning with higher temperatures. The reality is more complex: higher temperatures also spur more thunderstorms. Lightning from these thunderstorms is what has been igniting many more fires in these recent extreme events,” Veraverbeke said.

Study co-author Brendan Rogers at Woods Hole Research Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts, said these trends are likely to continue. “We expect an increasing number of thunderstorms, and hence fires, across the high latitudes in the coming decades as a result of climate change.” This is confirmed in the study by different climate model outputs.

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A lightning-caused wildfire burns in central Alaska in July 2008. Credits: BLM Alaska Fire Service

Study co-author Charles Miller of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said while data from the lightning networks were critical to this study, it is challenging to use these data for trend detection because of continuing network upgrades. “A spaceborne sensor that provides high northern latitude lightning data that can be linked with fire dynamics would be a major step forward,” he said.

The researchers found that the fires are creeping farther north, near the transition from boreal forests to Arctic tundra. “In these high-latitude ecosystems, permafrost soils store large amounts of carbon that become vulnerable after fires pass through,” said co-author James Randerson of the University of California, Irvine. “Exposed mineral soils after tundra fires also provide favorable seedbeds for trees migrating north under a warmer climate.”

“Taken together, we discovered a complex feedback loop between climate, lightning, fires, carbon and forests that may quickly alter northern landscapes,” Veraverbeke concluded. “A better understanding of these relationships is critical to better predict future influences from climate on fires, and from fires on climate.”

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

 

NOAA: Probability of Severe Weather Increases During Start of Summer

April showers bring May flowers, but what does June bring? History says mid-to-late June brings a higher probability of severe weather across much of the contiguous United States.

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The map above shows the historical probability of severe storms within a 25-mile radius of a given location on June 26. (For today's actual risk for severe weather, visit the Storm Prediction Center's webpage.) This time of year, there is at least some probability of severe weather for most of the lower 48 states. The probability is based on severe weather events from 1982-2011. “Severe weather” is defined as tornadoes, thunderstorm winds over 58 miles per hour, or hail larger than a quarter (one inch in diameter). The darker the color, the higher the number of severe weather reports on that date throughout history.

During the spring, severe weather patterns are dominated by the path of the jet stream. The atmospheric current operates over large distances that can span a third or more of the contiguous United States at any given time. As we head into summer in mid-to-late June, the jet stream retreats north into Canada. The result is that weather in the contiguous United States is more affected by smaller-scale weather processes known as “mesoscale”--weather systems ranging from 5-1,000 kilometers in size.

As we move from spring to summer, the predominant way severe weather forms across the U.S. changes. Once the jet stream moves north, severe weather occurs mainly due to mesoscale processes as larger areas of the country experience warm, humid conditions. These conditions are, historically, prime ingredients for severe weather events.

The map above comes from Climate.gov Data Snapshots map collection. It is based on the work by NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory. Download individual maps in a variety of formats from Climate.gov's Data Snapshots.

Information Courtesy NOAA

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

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Fireball Meteor Spotted Over Kentuckiana

Did you see something bright and maybe even loud early this morning? We have been getting a lot of questions about what that was!

It was most likely a fireball meteor!

The American Meteor Society has also received many reports of the fireball event that happened over Kentuckiana around 1 am EDT or 12 am CDT. Reports are coming in from Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. Most people described seeing a very bright blue to green light and many heard a sound as well, known as a sonic boom. 

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If you check the American Meteor Society's website, there are 31 reports, so far, about this event. It was seen over WV, KY, TN, OH, IN and IL on Monday, June 26th 2017. It was visible for roughly 3-8 seconds. 

Here is a map of all of the observer locations from AMS. 

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And a preliminary log of the reports. The report has information like the observers name, location, direction of the meteor, brightness, color, sounds, flashes and the expert level of the observer. The report circled is the one in Louisville. 

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 Here is some of that information a bit easier to read and for a few locations close to us. 

2017-06-26 01:03 EDT

Lancaster

KY

≈3.5s

2017-06-26 01:02 EDT

Louisville

KY

≈3.5s

2017-06-26 00:01 CDT

Fairfield

IL

≈3.5s

2017-06-26 00:01 CDT

Columbia

KY

≈7.5s

2017-06-26 00:01 CDT

Bowling Green

KY

≈7.5s

2017-06-26 01:00 EDT

Cleveland

OH

≈7.5s

2017-06-26 01:00 EDT

Berea

KY

≈1.5s

2017-06-26 01:00 EDT

Columbus

OH

≈3.5s

2017-06-26 01:00 EDT

Lexington

KY

≈3.5s

Did you hear or see something?? There is a video on  Marc Weinberg's Facebook page that shows the meteor, but I would love to see more!

Were able to capture anything on video? Please share it with me or even your story! The links to my social media pages are below:

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