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41 posts from October 2017

10/31/2017

Wintry Mix Possible Wednesday Morning

With cold air still streaming in to our area, we now turn our attention to the incoming precipitation first thing Wednesday morning.  

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Temperatures will fall into the middle and lower 30s across Kenutckiana tonight.  Then the rain moves in between midnight and daybreak Wednesday. 

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Since temperatures will be so low, especially for our far northern counties in southern Indiana, it is possible we could see a few snow flurries or sleet pellets in the air.  The best chance for that is across central Indiana, but our friends in the southern part of the state could also see some of that.  It's unlikely we'll see much winter weather in the Louisville metro area since we likely won't get cold enough.


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 You should expect scattered rain showers, some heavy, during the morning commute.  That's especially true for those of you east of I-65, so it would be a good idea to check the radar and the forecast in the morning before you head out the door. 

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Though temperatures have been low lately, it's unlikely any winter weather we see will accumulate on the ground.  This change-over to rain will happen pretty quickly after the sun rises, so don't expect to see snow on the ground when you wake up. 

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By evening we still have scattered rain in the forecast.  That means no matter what time of the day Wednesday you need to leave the house, you'll definitely want to grab an umbrella. 


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For those of you not crazy about winter, here's a bit of good news.  The next weather system moving our direction is a warm front.  Behind that warm front is much warmer air, so we will see high temperatures climb into the 60s and 70s this week. 

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Tune in to WDRB News tonight to hear Marc and Rick explain the winter weather chance as new data comes in.

Hannah's Facebook Page

Hannah's Twitter Page

-Hannah Strong

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10/30/2017

First Hard Freeze for Many Marks the End of Growing Season

Our cold weekend was punctuated by a Freeze Warning for almost all of our WDRB counties.

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Those not under Monday morning's warning are now under a separate Freeze Warning in effect for Tuesday morning.  Click here to read more about the active Freeze Warning. 

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Low temperatures Monday morning dropped so low that many places saw their first freeze of the season. That means growing season is over. The first freeze is defined as the first night where the temperature falls to 32º or cooler.  This is not the earliest first freeze, but it did come a few days earlier than normal. 

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That freeze happened during a period where temperatures are far below average, and we are going to see another freezing night tonight. Marc and Rick will explain the Freeze Warning in more detail on WRDB News tonight, so make sure to tune in.

Hannah's Facebook Page

Hannah's Twitter Page

-Hannah Strong

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FREEZE WARNING: Locations, Timing & How Low We Will Go...

...FREEZE WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 2 AM TO 9 AM CDT
TUESDAY...

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* TEMPERATURE...Temperatures dropping below freezing overnight,
reaching around 30 degrees late tonight and early Tuesday
morning.

  • IMPACTS...Vegetation that sensitive to temperature may be
    damaged or killed.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Freeze Warning means sub-freezing temperatures are imminent or
highly likely. These conditions will kill most outdoor plants and
other sensitive vegetation.

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-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

10/29/2017

Temperatures About to Climb, But Still Cooler Than Normal

 This weekend was cold; there's no question about it.  Sunday's high temperature stayed in the lower 40s, as did Saturday.  Notice on the almanac below the average high temperature for this time of year in Kentuckiana is the middle 60s.  This weekend was more than 20 degrees colder than it was supposed to be. 

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There are changes coming, though.  Remember the cold front that blasted through here on Friday? It dropped temperatures very quickly and brought us cold rain all evening.  That is now along the east coast.  It brought very cold air in behind it. 

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The next low pressure system (which will bring us rain Wednesday) is pushing warm air out in front of it.  The dashed black line in the map above represents the space between the old cold front and the new warm front.  That warm front is bringing double-digit temperature changes to our west in places that have already seen it move through. 

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That means our temperatures, too, will climb.  Monday's highs will be 10-15 degrees warmer than Sunday's were! 


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In fact, temperatures climb even more than the 50s! I'll explain in your forecast on WDRB News tonight at 10.

Hannah's Facebook Page

Hannah's Twitter Page

-Hannah Strong

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High Altitude Crossing of International Space Station

It's been a little while since we've had a good view of the International Space Station and we have a good chance tomorrow morning. While the timing is not ideal, it will be an high altitude passing, so you will be able to catch a glimpse before you start your day!

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Image Courtesy Of NASA

 

 A High Altitude Crossing Tomorrow Morning

When To Look...

The ISS will be visible once tonight at 7:03 am for 6 minutes and it will be variably cloudy and chilly with temps ranging in the lows in the upper to the 30s. The sun will be up an hour later, after 8 am. 

Where To Look...

At 7:03 am, the ISS will appear about 10 degrees above the horizon in the southwest part of the sky and move toward the northeast. It will set below the horizon in the NE part of the sky about 12 degrees above the horizon. The ISS will reach a peak elevation of 69 degrees above the horizon. So it will in the higher 1/2 of the sky.
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Weather 

Mother Nature may impact the show. The weather will not be the best, but hopefully the clouds will clear in time for the passing. There will certainly be a few clouds around and they have been slow to clear today. Also be sure to dress warm! 
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What to Look For?

The space station looks like an airplane or a very bright star moving across the sky, except it doesn’t have flashing lights or change direction. It will also be moving considerably faster than a typical airplane (airplanes generally fly at about 600 miles per hour; the space station flies at 17,500 miles per hour). NASA has a great example of what it would look like below...

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 For people viewing with the naked eye, the ISS will appear as a quick moving star going across the sky. It is notorious for moving really fast!

Let us know if you are able to grab any great pictures or spot the ISS! The links to my social media pages are below! 

Katie McGraw's Facebook Page

Katie McGraw's Twitter Page

-Katie McGraw 

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10/28/2017

Tropical Storm Philippe to Make Landfall in Florida

This has been an incredibly active tropical season, and Philippe is here to prove that season is not over yet.  The official forecast from the National Hurricane Center shows the cone of uncertainty moving over south Florida, which has prompted Tropical Storm Watches to be issued in the Keys. 

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Philippe is still a Tropical Storm based on its current strength.  The storm is moving generally north near 30 mph, but has sustained wind speeds of 40 mph with gusts at 50 mph.  Philippe is forecast to strengthen in the next two days. 

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The forecast track does take this storm through the Florida Keys and into south Florida.  Miami, in particular, looks to be in the path of this storm. 

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Heavy rain leading to some localized flash flooding and strong wind gusts are expected with this storm.  Three tornadoes were reported near Miami earlier this afternoon, and the threat for isolated tornadoes in south Florida exists tonight, too. 

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As this storm strengthens, we will update you. Make sure to tune in to WDRB News this weekend with Katie and Hannah for more weather updates. 

Hannah's Facebook Page

Hannah's Twitter Page

-Hannah Strong

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Rest of the Weekend: What to Expect?

Yesterday was a soggy end to the week as a cold front pushed through the region. Widespread rain impacted all of Kentuckiana with times of moderate to heavy rain. 

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Across the entire area, many saw roughly an inch of rain. Some a little less (about a half an inch) and some in Southern Indiana a little more (closer to two inches). 

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Temps have dropped SIGNIFICANTLY in the last day. I took this screen grab around 10:30 am. So since Friday at 10:30 to Saturday at 10:30 am, temps have dropped TWENTY degrees! And it is going to be chilly all day. Even with some sun, we won't make it out of the 40s today. With a light breeze, it will feel even colder. 

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As temps dropped, the rain became a cold rain and the potential for a wintry mix was there. To the snow lovers disappointment, there was very little frozen precipitation making it to the ground, especially snow. There were reports of ice pellets and sleet. All of the wet weather ended by 9 am this Saturday morning and clouds have thinned quite a bit. It will be variably cloudy all day. 

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The snow chance has gotten all the headlines. So what to expect for the rest of the weekend? There is a weak clipper just the NW of our region. It will drop south throughout the day and could bring a few more light showers/drizzle/flurries this evening, tonight or tomorrow morning. It shouldn't impact us all that much, but worth mentioning you might notice it or see it. 

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We will have sun and clouds for the first have of the day, but notice the HRRR (high resolution rapid refresh) model suggests by mid afternoon a few light showers will be brewing to our north. 

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By this evening, a few could make it to our area. It would be a drizzle or light rain at best and very isolated. 

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However, if this is happens and continues through the overnight, with temps around the freezing point, there could be a few flurries as well. 

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Otherwise, there will be mostly cloudy skies. Patchy frost is possible due to the low temps. 

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A chilly light wind out of the NW around 5-10 mph will make it feel slightly colder tonight and tomorrow morning! Some spots in the upper 20s! 

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Curious about Halloween? Our newest meteorologist Hannah Strong will have the latest details about the forecast, and if it will be a treat or if it will be a trick, this evening on WDRB News! Be sure to join her then! I will be back on air tomorrow morning from 6-9!

Hope to see you then! Until then, we can connect on social media.  The links to my social media pages are below!  

Katie McGraw's Facebook Page

Katie McGraw's Twitter Page

-Katie McGraw 

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10/27/2017

Snow Flakes on Saturday?

Our second cold front of the week is already dropping temperatures around the area and bringing some heavy rain to the area tonight. 

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This system starts as light rain for our area with some more moderate rainfall totals mixed in late tonight. Before the rain ends, it's possible many of you will see close to an inch of rain.

As that precipitation falls and temperatures drop overnight, some of the rain will briefly switch over to snow.  Check these images and the time stamps at the top. 
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As temperatures fall to their lowest during the early morning hours, we expect that transition to happen.  Notice low temperatures bottom out in the middle 30s for most, so snow is not a guarantee for all areas. 

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Since the ground is still so warm, it's unlikely we will see much snow accumulation.  Plus this snow is likely to fall right before daybreak and during the early hours of daylight, so if you sleep in you will likely miss the snow falling. 

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Areas east of I-65 are most likely to see the snowflakes fall.  Measurable snowfall this early in the season is pretty rare.  The last time we saw more than a trace of snow during the month of October was back in 1993.

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Marc and Rick will be explaining the snow chances more tonight on WDRB News, so make sure to check in with them! 

Hannah's Facebook Page

Hannah's Twitter Page

-Hannah Strong

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Snow In The Forecast...It's The Talk Of The Town

From Jude Redfield...

    This beautiful beginning to our Friday is about to turn to total garbage by days end. Heavy rain and falling temps arrive by evening for the entire region. High school football games will be soaking wet, windy and nasty cold.

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    Now let's talk snow! A transition to bursts of wet snow will occur after 1 am.  If the snow does happen most of us will be asleep and never see it. However, a few bursts could cover up grassy surfaces, car tops, roof tops etc. This could be on the ground at sunrise making for a photo op. Please share your photos if you get the accumulation. No snow accumulation is expected on pavement, but roads will be soaking wet from the heavy rain allowing for quite a bit of ponding.

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    Follow future radar images below to get an idea of how the rain to snow transition should occur.

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Temps

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    Again, slushy wet snow accumulation is possibly in the heavier bursts.  If you're up early in the morning and have some snow let the weather team know about it. We'd love to see those photos. -Jude Redfield-

10/26/2017

SCARS ON MARS: What Do You Think Causes These Squiggles In Hellas Planitia?

At around 2,200 kilometers in diameter, Hellas Planitia is the largest visible impact basin in the Solar System, and hosts the lowest elevations on Mars' surface as well as a variety of landscapes. This image from NASA's Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter (MRO) covers a small central portion of the basin and shows a dune field with lots of dust devil trails.

In the middle, we see what appears to be long and straight "scratch marks" running down the southeast (bottom-right) facing dune slopes. If we look closer, we can see these scratch marks actually squiggle back and forth on their way down the dune. These scratch marks are linear gullies.

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Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Just like on Earth, high-latitude regions on Mars are covered with frost in the winter. However, the winter frost on Mars is made of carbon dioxide ice (dry ice) instead of water ice. We believe linear gullies are the result of this dry ice breaking apart into blocks, which then slide or roll down warmer sandy slopes, sublimating and carving as they go.

The linear gullies exhibit exceptional sinuosity (the squiggle pattern) and we believe this to be the result of repeated movement of dry ice blocks in the same path, possibly in combination with different hardness or flow resistance of the sand within the dune slopes. Determining the specific process that causes the formation and evolution of sinuosity in linear gullies is a question scientists are still trying to answer. What do you think causes the squiggles?

This is a stereo pair with ESP_051836_1345.

The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather