04/30/2016

Severe Storms Possible All Weekend

Happy Saturday! 

And a soggy one it is! After some light rain last night/overnight, showers spilled over the region from 7-10 am and will continue into the early afternoon. 

Our set up for today includes two low pressure systems and a warm front. Our first dose of rain is thanks to the warm front, as it starts to lift north toward the area. We will get a brief break this afternoon, before a second round of showers and storms arrives this evening/tonight. 

4-30 srf radar

The Storm Prediction Center has almost our entire region under the risk for severe weather this evening. As the warm front lifts, it will increase our dew point temps and the moisture content of the atmosphere.  There is also decent wind sheer as winds increase aloft. Therefore, there could be some strong to severe storms. The main threat is going to be hail and gusty winds. However, it really all depends on what happens during the dry time today. 

4-30 spc today

Some of us will continue to see some rain this afternoon, mainly in the NE portion of the area. The rest of us will be briefly dry before act two this evening. It looks as though it will remain cloudy, and therefore, limit instability. It is going to be a touch and go situation for tonight in terms of severity, until we see what happens this afternoon. 

4-30 sat 3 pm

The good news: One of the many events going on tonight is the opening night at Churchill Downs!

The bad news: Prepare for showers and storms. They will be scattered at first, but the likelihood of them increases throughout the evening. 

4-30 church downs opening night

By this evening, more showers and storms begin to fire off and this is our best chance for some severe weather. Again, threats are mainly small hail and gusty winds. It all comes down to the afternoon hours and if destabilization is able to occur, which will encourage severe weather.

4-30 8 pm

A positive of the wet weather is that pollen counts are a lot lower today. But they spike right back up tomorrow and into next week. That's because Sunday/Monday will not be nearly as soggy. 

Note there are three new main allergens: oak, mulberry and grasses. 

4-30 allergies

Showers and storms will clear out overnight and we will start off Sunday with mostly cloudy skies. 

4-30 sun 6 am

4-30 sun 10 am

BUT we are not done with the rain quite yet!

More showers and storms are possible for tomorrow afternoon but they will be more scattered. Notice on AT, the showers and storms are fewer and farther between compared to today, but some will have the potential to become severe. For now, SPC has us under a "marginal" threat level for tomorrow, which is the lowest level. The ingredients for tomorrow are almost the opposite from today. Models are showing more instability, but the winds are veering and there is no convergence. With CAPE levels as high as they are though, severe weather is possible. 

4-30 sun 3 pm

We could see some heavy rain at times with these showers and storms. Models are not in complete agreement with this. I will say about half an inch to an inch. Below are the GFS, NAM, Euro models and they go from the lowest rain totals possible to the highest. 

4-30 gfs lowest

4-30 nam preci

4-30 euro highest

The cold front will finally trace through on Monday, keeping clouds thick. There could also be a rogue shower around, but for the most part, we will be dry. 

4-30 mon am

Remember, you can always have your forecast on the go by downloading our smartphone app! Just check it out before you leave the house in order to plan ahead! 

App

Rick will be in this evening for Jeremy and he will have the latest on the severe weather threat on WDRB. Be sure to tune in to see the latest data! Also, the derby is now on the seven day forecast! 

I'll see you tomorrow morning from 6-9 am with another update in the forecast! Before then, let's connect!

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04/29/2016

Rain Chances this Weekend. . . Timing and Strength

So many events; so little time; so many eyes on the forecast! 

This is a high pressure time of the year for meteorologists in Kentuckiana! With this being my first Thunder, KDF and soon to be Derby- I am learning this first hand!

Unfortunately, Mother Nature AND computer models don't care about our outdoor plans. This is a tricky forecast for the weekend, due to a complex pattern. On top of that, the models just do not want to agree. They can't even stay in agreement with themselves from run to run. So the confidence in the forecast is bit lower than normal, which is something I, nor any meteorologist, enjoys. 

Friday Night:

We are tracking showers and storms to our southwest, spread along a warm front. They are pretty close to our region, but they are approaching a dry air mass around our neck of the woods. That's thanks to a cold front that swept through the area yesterday, it cooled us down a bit and cleared out the humidity and moisture content and is now providing a barrier from the rain. 

4-29 current radar

Therefore, as these showers and storms approach, some are burning off and becoming virga. Virga is rain that doesn't reach the surface, because the atmosphere is too dry. However, eventually, the rain will win out and we will see some this evening and tonight. 

4-29 satradwfronts

Notice on AT of the HRRR model, there is a decent chance for some rain tonight, but shouldn't be a complete washout as this shows, because of the low dew point temperatures.

4-29 hrr 1130

Saturday:

Heading into tomorrow, there will be rain for Mini/Marathon and it appears they should spill out across the region by mid morning and at times the rain could be rather heavy.  There is also not only the potential for rain, but for thunderstorms as well.

4-29 adv sat 10 am

4-29 adv 1130 am

We will get a break mid-day, where spotty showers and storms are possible. If this clears out completely and we are able to recover from the morning rain, it will improve the chances for severe weather in the later part of the day.  

Sat 6 pm

The Storm Prediction Center has the western portion of Kentucky and SW of Indiana under the "slight" risk for severe weather for tomorrow evening. This is where a low will be positioned. Meantime, the previously mentioned warm front will lift to the north. Dew point temps will increase, providing some nice moisture content and westerly flow aloft could be strong enough to produce some strong to severe storms. The main threat is going to be hail and gusty winds. 

4-29 spc sat

The better potential for severe extends from SW IL to Eastern Texas, but it cannot be ruled out for us! 

4-29 severe risk over weekend

The second wave moves through late Saturday, following the warm front, spiking our chances for showers and storms. Again, these could pack a punch and could be strong to severe. 

4-29 sat 10 pm

After those clear out overnight, we will be dry to start off Sunday. But then a lazy cold front will drop from the north during the afternoon on Sunday. 

4-29 sun 8 am

It will fire off another round of some showers and storms. As of now, we are under the lowest risk from SPC for severe weather. There is some decent CAPE, but there is no convergence and there is no real forcing to produce severe weather. However, there is a chance for severe weather on Sunday afternoon as well as Saturday. 

4-29 adv sun 3 pm

My, oh my. What a tricky forecast. So many elements to consider and it doesn't stop on Sunday. There is more tricky forecasting for next week. 

Marc has the latest information and data for you tonight on WDRB. Be sure to tune in! Also, be sure to download our weather app, so you can check the radar before you head out the door this weekend! 

App

I'll see you tomorrow morning from 6-9 am! Before then, let's connect! Find me on social media!

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04/28/2016

Remembering One Of The Largest Tornado Outbreaks In U.S. History...

It was around this date five years ago that the largest sequence of tornadoes in recorded history began over the Southeastern United States. During the four day period between April 25th and April 28th 2011, an astonishing 358 tornadoes occurred from Texas through Georgia, and as far north as Southern Canada! 205 tornadoes touched down on April 27th alone, making it the most prolific tornado outbreak every recorded even surpassing the raw number of tornadoes produced during the Super Outbreak of April 3, 1974. In total, 348 people perished during the four day series of outbreaks with 238 fatalities occurring in the hardest hit state of Alabama.

1

In an unprecedented fashion, SPC issued Moderate and High Risks for severe weather on three consecutive days covering April 25th, 26th and the 27th.  

2

Image Credit: NOAA

The long duration event was driven by a very strong and slow moving upper level trough of low pressure that had dug deep into the Southern Plains. By the 27th, the powerful upper storm system began to eject eastward into the Southeastern US with jet stream winds in excess of 140 mph. 

3

Image Credit: NOAA

These high speed, upper level winds combined with a super warm and moist air mass at the surface to produce an absolute explosion of thunderstorms on the 27th.

 

Video Courtesy: thewxmann

Similar to what occurred on April 3, 1974, every storm that developed that day began to rapidly rotate producing a swarm of tornadoes.  

 

Video Courtesy: Charles Kuster

Not only were there an extreme number of tornadoes, many of them grew to monsterous proportions with 44 tornadoes being assessed as strong, EF-3 or greater in intensity and four of them were classified as EF-5! To put this in perspective, the US only averages around one EF-5 per year. This rivals only the 1974 Super Outbreak that produced 63 strong tornadoes and a staggering six EF-5's. 

 

Video Courtesy: TVNweather

The 2011 severe weather season went on to produce the catastrophic Joplin Missouri EF-5 and will go down as the deadliest year for tornadoes in the last 60 years. 

In total, 540 people perished due to tornadic storms in 2011.  This compares to only 564 that were killed by tornadoes during the 10 year period from 2001 through 2010. Hopefully, we don't see a season like EVER again!

 

 

 

 

 

 

04/27/2016

Tornado Watch Issued for Parts of Kentuckiana!

A Tornado Watch has been issued for portions of Southwest Indiana and West-Central Kentucky.  This watch remains in effect until midnight EDT/11 pm CDT and includes several of our western counties.

Warnings

URGENT - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED

   TORNADO WATCH NUMBER 117

   NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK

   510 PM CDT WED APR 27 2016

   THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER HAS ISSUED A

   * TORNADO WATCH FOR PORTIONS OF

     SOUTHWEST INDIANA

     WESTERN KENTUCKY

   * EFFECTIVE THIS WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING FROM 510 PM

     UNTIL 1100 PM CDT.

   * PRIMARY THREATS INCLUDE...

     A COUPLE TORNADOES POSSIBLE

     ISOLATED DAMAGING WIND GUSTS TO 70 MPH POSSIBLE

     ISOLATED LARGE HAIL EVENTS TO 1.5 INCHES IN DIAMETER POSSIBLE

 

   SUMMARY...ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS OVER WESTERN KY ARE INTERACTING

   WITH A WEAK BOUNDARY...AND BECOMING OCCASIONALLY SEVERE.  ISOLATED

   TORNADOES AND LOCALLY DAMAGING WIND GUSTS WILL BE POSSIBLE FOR A FEW

   HOURS THIS EVENING.

 

   THE TORNADO WATCH AREA IS APPROXIMATELY ALONG AND 45 STATUTE

   MILES EAST AND WEST OF A LINE FROM 40 MILES NORTHEAST OF

   EVANSVILLE INDIANA TO 45 MILES WEST SOUTHWEST OF BOWLING GREEN

   KENTUCKY.  FOR A COMPLETE DEPICTION OF THE WATCH SEE THE

   ASSOCIATED WATCH OUTLINE UPDATE (WOUS64 KWNS WOU7).

   PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

 

   REMEMBER...A TORNADO WATCH MEANS CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE FOR

   TORNADOES AND SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS IN AND CLOSE TO THE WATCH

   AREA. PERSONS IN THESE AREAS SHOULD BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR

   THREATENING WEATHER CONDITIONS AND LISTEN FOR LATER STATEMENTS

   AND POSSIBLE WARNINGS.

 

Marc and Rick will have a full update on our severe threat this evening on WDRB News.

 

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

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Heavy Rain Expected for Next Week

We are still seeing abnormally dry conditions in southeastern portions of our viewing area, including southern portions of Nelson County, southern Washington County, all of Marion County, northern Larue, and eastern Hardin and Taylor counties. April has been a dry month. According to the National Weather Service we have seen 1.87'' of rain so far, with three days left in the month. We normally should have 3.41''. Therefore, we are 1.54''deficient in rain for the month. 

6a0148c78b79ee970c01bb08ef3312970d-500wi

After seeing just over .30'' of rain yesterday in metro, we have gotten another dose of rain today. Showers and storms are likely to continue straight through this evening, which could result in some decent rain totals by Thursday. 

4-27 radar today

Notice on Advancetrak below, from this evening until tomorrow morning, we could see another inch to even an inch and a half of rain. 

4-27 adv raintotal

There could be some heavy downpours. There is also a slight risk for severe weather, with the main threats being hail and straight-line winds. The mostly cloudy skies and cooler air from all the rain we've seen so far, keeps the instability available for storms rather low. 

4-27 adv today

Not Done Yet! 

We have a chance for some pop up showers and storms tomorrow and we get a brief break on Friday with pretty nice conditions and partly cloudy skies. That changes by the weekend.

Notice AT has showers returning the area by Saturday morning. At the start of the mini and marathon, showers are approaching the area and the chance for showers improves/increases throughout the day. 

4-27 sat

You can see this nicely on the GFS model run of AT of Saturday evening. A warm front is lifting north into the area and a low pressure is just to the SW over the plains. It will slowly progress to the mid-atlantic coast by the end of the weekend. A low level jet will extend moisture from the gulf, allowing for widespread showers and scattered storms and heavy rain is expected. 

4-27 sat pm

Scrolling through the next three images, you can see how the rain continues into late Saturday night, following the passage of the front and into Sunday morning.

#soggy

4-27 sat pm late

4-27 sun am

The low crosses over our region by Sunday afternoon and evening. We are watching for the potential for severe weather then as well. 

4-27 sun pm

With rain continuing for a good portion of a 48 hour period, rain totals are expected to be high, about 1-3 inches. At this point the NAM only goes through Saturday evening, but still shows hefty amounts in the NW portions of our viewing area. 

4-27 nam rainfall

The GFS and the Euro models take us through the entire weekend and beyond. Both have rain totals over 2 inches by Monday. The GFS is a bit more modest, with totals around 2 inches while the Euro is around 2.5'' to even nearly 3'' by Monday morning.  

4-27 gfs rainfall

4-27 euro rainfall

NCEP WPC shows an even more extended view, through next Wednesday, with nearly 4'' of rain. 

4-27 wpc

Taking in all of this information, the general gist is that we have a damp week ahead and will make up for the lack of rain we have seen so far this month, in just a few days. Be aware of the threat for flooding. There were flash flood warnings already issued today for Southern Hardin and Eastern Grayson Counties. Remember, "Turn Around, Don't Drown!" on flooded roads. Learn more about your forecast for the rest of this rainy week tonight on WDRB with both Marc and Rick. 

I'll see you tomorrow at 11:30-12:30 pm! Before then, let's connect! Find me on social media!

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Severe Weather Discussion

From Jude Redfield (10:30am)

    A warm front is triggering numerous showers and storms. While this means a very high chance for on and off rain today it also means the risk for severe storms stays low. The mostly cloudy skies and somewhat rain cooled air keeps the instability available for storms held in check. If we were to stay dry all day (which doesn't appear to be the case) then widespread severe storms would be likely. The radar image below shows pockets of heavy rain and lightning lifting to the north with the warm front.

Shoes (2)

    The atmospheric juice available for severe weather looks to be just high enough for another low end risk at severe storms this afternoon and this evening.

RadarHelp1

    This borderline situation means a scattering of severe t-storm warnings are possible. The primary threats come in the form of straight-line winds and small hail.

Shoes

    For planning purposes the chart below helps us figure out the most likely times to get wet. These on and off showers and storms seem relentless through tonight.

Specialgraphic

    Make sure to keep up to date with the rest of the weather gang as they update the radar images and keep a watchful eye on our severe weather chances. -Jude Redfield-

04/26/2016

Severe Thunderstorm Watch Issued!

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch has been issued for much of Kentuckiana and includes metro Louisville.  The watch goes until 11 pm EDT.  

Warnings

Storm Prediction Center Severe Thunderstorm Watch 110

URGENT - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH NUMBER 110 NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK 300 PM CDT TUE APR 26 2016

THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER HAS ISSUED A * SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH FOR PORTIONS OF EASTERN ILLINOIS SOUTHERN AND SOUTH CENTRAL INDIANA WESTERN AND NORTHERN KENTUCKY FAR SOUTHEAST MISSOURI * EFFECTIVE THIS TUESDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING FROM 300 PM UNTIL 1000 PM CDT. *

PRIMARY THREATS INCLUDE... SCATTERED DAMAGING WIND GUSTS TO 70 MPH POSSIBLE ISOLATED LARGE HAIL EVENTS TO 1 INCH IN DIAMETER POSSIBLE SUMMARY...EASTERN MO-WESTERN IL SQUALL LINE NOW SE OF ST LOUIS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE GENERALLY EASTWARD...WITH A CONTINUING RISK FOR DAMAGING WIND. ISOLATED STORMS FORMING AHEAD OF THE LINE ALSO COULD POSE A LOCALLY DAMAGING WIND AND HAIL THREAT THROUGH MID-EVENING THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH AREA IS APPROXIMATELY ALONG AND 90 STATUTE MILES EAST AND WEST OF A LINE FROM 30 MILES EAST NORTHEAST OF TERRE HAUTE INDIANA TO 35 MILES EAST OF PADUCAH KENTUCKY. FOR A COMPLETE DEPICTION OF THE WATCH SEE THE ASSOCIATED WATCH OUTLINE UPDATE (WOUS64 KWNS WOU0).

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS... REMEMBER...A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH MEANS CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE FOR SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS IN AND CLOSE TO THE WATCH AREA. PERSONS IN THESE AREAS SHOULD BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR THREATENING WEATHER CONDITIONS AND LISTEN FOR LATER STATEMENTS AND POSSIBLE WARNINGS. SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS CAN AND OCCASIONALLY DO PRODUCE TORNADOES. 

Marc has a full update on our severe potential this evening on WDRB News. 

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

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04/25/2016

Storms Arrive Late Tomorrow. Could They Be Severe?

We are on a row now.  We've seen nothing but spectacular spring weather since Saturday afternoon and now we wait on a pair of storm systems looming to our west. 

Jet stream

The first one, a slow moving cold front located across the plains looks to approach the area by late tomorrow with increasing storm chances here locally. 

The second system, a vigorous upper level low spinning over the Desert Southwest, looks to bring an outbreak of severe weather and tornadoes across the Plains where a MODERATE RISK of severe weather has been issued from Southern Nebraska to the Red River Valley in North Texas.

Day2otlk_1730

Locally, the Storm Prediction Center has us in a "Marginal Risk" for severe storms tomorrow.  

Let's time it out with AdvanceTrak...

AT starts us off mostly cloudy and mild with a few showers or t-showers for some of our Southern Indiana Counties.

At1

Most of the area remains precipitation free through early afternoon.

At2

Temps should warm back into the low 80's during the afternoon with scattered showers/storms developing late day.

At3

AT shows these storms growing quite strong by early evening as they roll through the metro.

At4

Storms exit our eastern counties by mid-evening.

At5

So what do I think?

I think the Marginal Risk placed by SPC is a good forecast for us because wind shear will be lacking over our area.  However, if we do get enough heating, there will be a good deal of humidity in place by then allowing for our atmosphere to destabilize enough to produce some stronger storms.  The key will be how much sunshine do we see and how much heating.  Worst case scenario and I think we are looking at a few storms capable of producing some briefly severe winds or small hail.  

Rick will be in with a full update on the situation tonight on WDRB News at 10 and 11.

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

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Severe Storms On The Horizon

From Jude Redfield...

    Heat & humidity help fuel storms by Tuesday afternoon. While the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) does not have us in a slight risk Tuesday or Wednesday I think one could make an argument to add Kentuckiana during these time periods.

RadarHelp

    The best chance for storms tomorrow starts up after 3pm. Future radar has a pretty good handle on what kind of coverage we should expect. As always the disclaimer is don't take the placement and exact time as gospel.

Shoes (2)

    While I do think we are in line for a few severe storms please look at the map below to see the illustration why we don't have the likelihood of a severe weather outbreak Tuesday or Wednesday. The strong jet stream winds remain displaced from Kentuckiana along with any strong low pressure centers. We will have very high levels of instability and moisture, but remain limited in other aspects needed for severe weather criteria. A severe weather outbreak is LIKELY near the strong low pressure and intense jet stream in the Great Plains.  Many tornadoes are expected in that location.

Snow Reports

    I put together a map that combines the severe weather chances for both Tuesday and Wednesday. In my opinion Kentuckiana is in the lower chance compared to out west, but as stated earlier I do think a scattering of severe storms are likely in the Ohio Valley during these times.

RadarHelp1

    With so much sticky air in place Tuesday and Wednesday very heavy rain will accompany any t-storm. Locations that see multiple rounds of storms could easily exceed 2" - 3"  These amounts would be localized, but could lead to a few flash flood warnings.  Our primary risks of severe weather come in the form of hail and damaging straight line winds.

Shoes

    At this point in time the chart below breaks down the rain/storm chances into Thursday. Please check with Jeremy Kappell  and Marc Weinberg this afternoon for any adjustments needed to this chart. New data comes in later today and they will make the necessary changes.

Specialgraphic

    We do have high chances for rain and storms, but plenty of dry time is expected the remainder of the week as well. Hopefully everyone gets a chance to enjoy this preview of summer. Stay tuned to future blogs from the WDRB weather team for updates on our severe weather chances. -Jude Redfield-

04/24/2016

Kentucky Oaks and Derby by the Numbers

I hope you had a great weekend so far and if you took part in the Thunder Over Louisville festivities- how about that weather! As we forecasted, the clouds decreased, they just took their grand ol' time. Eventually though, we had plenty of sunshine, a full vertical air show and a gorgeous firework show, thanks to the clear conditions! 

4-24 timelapse thunder

Check out that sunset from yesterday! Phenomenal! This photo was sent to us through our weather app. It was taken by April Harris of the Missing Man Formation, for pilot Jay Gordon. The memorial tribute was a great honor and left me with chills! 

4-24 missing man formatio

Of course, Thunder is the kick off to the Kentucky Derby Festival and the countdown is on! Only 13 days away! So the pressure is really on for us to get the forecast right! 

But. . . it's a bit too early for that. (Sigh!)

4-24 churchill downs

Instead, let's look back at the historical data for both Oaks and the Kentucky Derby. The National Weather Service has all the data nicely organized for both races and those are the numbers you will see in this blog! 

Last year's Derby was a real winner! And I am not just talking about American Pharaoh winning the race and eventually the Triple Crown, but the weather was also spectacular. According to the NWS, on May 2nd of last year, we were partly cloudy with a high of 79° and a low of 52°.  One day earlier for Oaks, it was mostly sunny with a high of 73° and a low of 45°. I think it's fair to say many of you would take those conditions year after year. 

But. . .  as you know, that is not always the case. 

Peaks and Valleys

For all of the 141 races for both Oaks and Derby, temperatures fell between 47° and 94° for the high temperatures. Overnight lows fell between 36° and 72°.  

The wettest day for Oaks was on May 5, 1961 when 1.40'' of rain fell. But the super soaker event was derby day May 11, 1918 when 2.31'' of rain fell!! 

4-24 oaks by the numbers

The cold temperatures on May 4, 1957 on derby day were also accompanied by 20-25 mph winds from the north! So it was a chilly breeze! It probably felt about 10 degrees colder than the actual air temperature. 

4-24 derby numbers

Closer Look: 

Diving in a bit deeper into the data, NWS says out of 141 days, 78 of them had rain at some point of the day for Oaks. That means more than half of the races were damp, or 56%, to be exact. There was also a NINE year stretch of rain occurring in the 24 hour period. But there was also a 7 year dry spell . . . 118 - 112 years ago. 

4-24 more oaks info

Out of the 141 races for the Kentucky Derby, 65 of them had rain at some point of the day.  That is less than half, or 46%. An interesting thing to note, in 1989, sleet was observed for four minutes around 1 pm! There was another soggy stretch as well and recently too. From 2007-2013, there was rain during the 24 hours of race day. But there was an even longer dry stretch! For 12 years, from 1875-1886, there was no rain, for not only the day, but also for the race! 

4-24 more derby info

Day by Day Info: 

There is so much more information and if you want to learn more about a specific day in Derby or Oaks history, follow these links below! You can see all the data for every year, even the winner of the race! 

Historical Derby Info

Historical Oaks Info

Speaking of specifics, how about the forecast for the new work week? There are a lot of events on the calendar for the days ahead, including Fest-a-Ville, the Great Balloon Race and the marathon! This week's forecast is looking a bit unsettled. A stark contrast from the calm conditions we have been enjoying this weekend. Learn more this evening with Jeremy tonight and Jude tomorrow morning! 

Let's connect! Find me on social media!

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-Meteorologist Katie McGraw