08/29/2015

Updating Weekend Rain Chances...

Summer is back! Along with the heat and humidity, a few storms are possible this weekend. Many of us will end up missing out on the rain, but downpours and lighting should be expected with any storm that does boil up. Severe weather is very unlikely as well. Daytime heating will spark hit or miss storms as we head into the afternoon and evening hours, but NOT MANY. Notice on future radar how the best chance lines up along and south of the Ohio River...

Blog 1

 More clouds along with a slightly better chance for scattered storms arrives tomorrow. Even then, they will still be scattered in nature meaning a good chunk of the area stays dry. Both days we should see highs in the mid to upper 80's, feeling closer to 90 when you factor in the humidity...

Blog 2

If you have any outdoor plans, just download the WDRB Weather App and you get access to our FREE radar! Make sure you turn on WDRB tonight for an update with Jeremy Kappell. 

Blog 4

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

Katrina Special: Marc Weinberg's Experience Chasing Hurricane Katrina...

Ten years ago, one of the strongest storms to ever strike the United States made landfall along the Louisiana–Mississippi border. Hurricane Katrina remains the costliest natural disaster to ever impact the United States and the deadliest since 1928. The cold statistics are by now well known: 1,836 deaths, an estimated 300,000 homes destroyed or made uninhabitable, and about $108 billion in damages. 

Katrina1615z-050829-1kg12

Hurricane Katrina, as seen by the GEOS-12 satellite. Image Courtesy: NASA

WDRB's Chief Meteorologist Marc Weinberg went down to Gulfport, MS to chase Hurricane Katrina. The following video is a 30 minute special showing highlights from the chase and the horrific aftermath...

 

Video Courtesy:  WDRBWeather's channel

 

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

08/28/2015

Signs Of Katrina Linger In The Marshes...

Ten years after making landfall, scars from Hurricane Katrina still linger. And not just in the blighted houses that mar some neighborhoods. The marshes and swamps that buffer New Orleans from the Gulf of Mexico still show evidence of Katrine’s wrath.

The wetlands surrounding Delacroix, a fishing town to the southeast of New Orleans, were some of the hardest hit by the hurricane. Pounding surf, driving winds, and a potent storm surge transformed the marshes by picking apart mats of dead grass, stirring up and disbursing soft underlying sediments, scouring several new channels, and depositing leftover sediment and debris in new areas.

This pair of false-color images shows the transformation. The Thematic Mapper on Landsat 5 acquired the top image a week before the storm hit. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired the second image in August 2015. With this band combination, normal vegetation appears bright green and flood-damaged vegetation is brown. Water is dark blue. (Note that you also can download a large image of the area as it appeared two months after the storm.)

1

One Week Before Katrina         Image Credit: NASA

2

One Week After Katrina         Image Credit: NASA

Katrina delivered a massive surge of water that dramatically enlarged lakes, including Lake Lery and Petit Lake. It also scoured new channels and widened canals in ways that eliminated large amounts of marshland. As seen in the 2015 image, flood-damaged vegetation has returned to its normal color, but the enlarged waterways have persisted.

A team of U.S Geological Survey scientists has published detailed maps of land change around Delacroix. By looking at a series of Landsat and commercial satellite images of the area over time, and comparing them pixel by pixel, they have determined how much effect Hurricane Katrina had on the marshes compared to Gustav, another hurricane that struck in 2008.

Their conclusion was that Katrina’s extreme winds, long duration (20 hours), and major storm surge (up to five meters) did serious, lasting damage to Delacroix’s marshes; Gustav reinforced it in 2008. After Katrina’s flooding had subsided, 8.2 percent of the pixels in their study area had changed from land to water; Gustav changed an additional 1.4 percent of pixels.

Katrina did build new land in a few areas. In the 2015 image, for instance, note the expansion near Big Mar and along some of the other new ponds and channels west of Lake Lery. In total, 3.3 percent of pixels were converted from water before Katrina to land afterward.

Land losses tended to be more severe in freshwater and intermediate marshes closer to the town than in saltwater and brackish marshes closer the Gulf. Freshwater marshes have more pliable soil that is easily washed away. They also tend to support plants with shallower root systems than salt marshes.

“If Delacroix continues to dodge hurricanes, we can expect to see the extent of aquatic vegetation increase even if we don’t see the full reestablishment of healthy marsh in all the areas that had it before Katrina,” said Monica Palaseanu-Lovejoy, one of the U.S. Geological Survey scientists.

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

08/27/2015

Tropical Storm Erika Update...

Tropical Storm Erika is in the eastern Caribbean Sea, dumping heavy rain on the Lesser Antilles. Deadly flooding has been reported in Dominica where four lives have been lost. Check out this scary video of water tearing through the streets...

 

Video Courtesy: JNews

Erika is poorly organized at the moment as is travels to the west-northwest at 16 mph. Winds are sustained at 45 mph with gusts up to 65 mph. It should maintain it's tropical storm status as it moves across Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and the eventually the Bahamas.

Mail.google.com

The exact track for Erika is still uncertain, but Florida and the Carolinas needs to be on alert. Notice that the latest forecast has Erika picking up steam as it approaches the U.S. coast as a Category 1 hurricane early next week...

Mail.google.com

We will keep an eye on this and have updates online and on air. Don't forget to flip on WDRB tonight for a look at the weekend forecast with Marc Weinberg. 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

08/25/2015

Extended Forecast Trending MUCH Warmer!

It has been nothing less than a sensational start to the workweek with temps running a full 10 degrees below normal for much of our region.

Gfs_t2m_a_f_conus2_2

While the early taste of fall continues for a couple more days, all good things eventually must end and so too will our unseasonably cool pattern. 

The latest data suggests that temps will gradually warm by late week and through the weekend.

Today's run of the GFS (below) shows temps actually warming to above normal again by early next week with highs returning to the low 90's here locally. 

Gfs_t2m_a_f_conus2_31

This warm up may not be short lived either.  Medium range models indicate that the warm spell may well last through next week and possibly beyond.  

The folks at the Climate Prediction Center agree with this assessment and have placed our area in a rather high, 70% for above normal temps in the the 8 to 14 day range.  

814temp_new

This means we will be sweating again soon and a bonafide heat wave may be lurking as we head into September.  

For the latest on how warm it will get, be sure to join Marc for an updated forecast tonight on WDRB.

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

Jeremy 6sx

Jeremy's Bio

Find me on Facebook!

Follow me on Twitter!

Email me at jkappell@wdrb.com

08/24/2015

NASA Image of the Day: Strange Sighting From ISS

Viewing from a point over northwest Mexico, astronauts aboard the International Space Station looked northeast and shot this unusual photograph of a red sprite above the white light of an active thunderstorm. In the top image, the sprite was 2,200 kilometers (1,400 miles) away, high over Missouri or Illinois; the lights of Dallas, Texas appear in the foreground. The sprite shoots up to the greenish airglow layer, near a rising moon.

Iss044e045553Full resolution image available here.

Two minutes and 58 seconds later, as the ISS was over the coastal Mexican resort of Acapulco, the crew documented another red sprite (lower image) over a brilliant white thundercloud and lightning discharge near the coast of El Salvador. The shorter distance to the storm—about 1,150 km (710 miles)—makes it somewhat easier to see details of the sprite. City lights are a diffuse yellow because they are shining through clouds.

Iss044e045576Full resolution image available here.

These photos show the sprite’s tendrils reaching as much as 100 kilometers above Earth’s surface. Sprites are major electrical discharges, but they are not lightning in the usual sense. Instead, they are a cold plasma phenomenon without the extremely hot temperatures of lightning that we see underneath thunderstorms. Red sprites are more like the discharge of a fluorescent tube. Bursts of sprite energy are thought to occur during most large thunderstorm events. They were first photographed in 1989.

Astronaut photographs ISS044-E-45553 and ISS044-E-45576 were acquired on August 10, 2015, with a Nikon D4 digital camera using a 28 millimeter lens, and are provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The images were taken by a member of the Expedition 44 crew. The images have been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by M. Justin Wilkinson, Texas State University, Jacobs Contract at NASA-JSC. 

Information and Images Courtesy NASA

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

Jeremy 6sx

Jeremy's Bio

Find me on Facebook!

Follow me on Twitter!

Email me at jkappell@wdrb.com

 

08/23/2015

Strong Cold Front to bring Coolest Temps in Months!

After a cooler than normal start to the Kentucky State Fair, we got those temps back to normal today with an official high of 88° at the Louisville International Airport.

Almanac

Now with the arrival of a strong cold front this evening, it looks like a true early taste of fall over the next several days with lots of sunshine expected and low humidity.  

Rad3

In addition, temps look to run about 10 degrees below normal with highs only expected to reach up into the 70's for most of the area tomorrow through Wednesday.

At1

Overnight lows are expected to be as low as they have been since back in May with some areas perhaps dropping into the upper 40's by Tuesday morning!  Brrr!!

At2

The chill won't be a quick hitter.  Temps are expected to remain below normal through Friday.  

CNIyMk5VEAAl57S

It looks like "summer-like" temps will appropriately return for the end of the state fair next weekend.

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

Jeremy 6sx

Jeremy's Bio

Find me on Facebook!

Follow me on Twitter!

Email me at jkappell@wdrb.com

Humidity And Storm Chances Return Today! The Latest Timing and Threats...

It will feel more like August today with a return of the heat and humidity. Sunshine sends numbers into the upper 80's before more clouds spill in during the afternoon. We had several downpours this morning along I-64. A cold front will bring another opportunity for scattered storms this afternoon/evening...

Blog 1

Not everyone gets wet. In fact, I have a feeling most of us will miss out on the rain. As a broken line of storms move in from the northwest, select locations should expect downpours and lightning. There may be some gusty winds as well, but I wouldn't be too worried about severe weather. If a stronger storm or two did materialize, it would probably occur in Southern Indiana where the wind energy is a bit more favorable. 

Blog 2

Cooler and drier air rushes in behind the front for the start of the work and school week. Dress for some cool mornings as lows dip down into the 50's, and perhaps 40's early Tuesday!

11

9

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

08/22/2015

ISS Will Cross Our Sky Soon!

The International Space Station (ISS) will be making another pass over out sky this evening.  

At a blazing speed of 17,000 mph, it will cross our sky in about 3 minutes total time.

  Z iss crossing

You will be able to view it rise over the Western horizon at approximately 9:16 pm ET this evening.  

It will appear as the brightest object in that part of the sky.  The ISS will move quickly towards the southeast and disappear over the Southern horizon at approximately 9:19 pm.

This ISS crossing will be fairly low in the sky only rising to around 24° altitude so you'll need a good view of the southwestern sky.

6a0148c78b79ee970c017c370e8365970bLong Exposure Photograph of the ISS Credit: Mark Humpage

See an amazing time-lapse video taken from the ISS here.

For information on how to photograph the ISS: http://www.universetoday.com/93588/a-beginners-guide-to-photographing-the-international-space-station-iss/#ixzz2Lll4JR00

6a0148c78b79ee970c017c370e8401970b

You can track is progress live here on isstracker.com.

With only a few clouds overhead, viewing should be good for most of our area.  Good luck!

WDRB Meteorologist Jeremy Kappell

Jeremy 6sx

Jeremy's Bio

Find me on Facebook!

Follow me on Twitter!

Email me at jkappell@wdrb.com

 

From NASA: There is No Asteroid Threatening Earth!

Numerous recent blogs and web postings are erroneously claiming that an asteroid will impact Earth, sometime between Sept. 15 and 28, 2015. On one of those dates, as rumors go, there will be an impact -- "evidently" near Puerto Rico -- causing wanton destruction to the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States and Mexico, as well as Central and South America.

Untitled

Image Credit: NASA

 

That's the rumor that has gone viral -- now here are the facts.

 

"There is no scientific basis -- not one shred of evidence -- that an asteroid or any other celestial object will impact Earth on those dates," said Paul Chodas, manager of NASA's Near-Earth Object office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

 

In fact, NASA's Near-Earth Object Observations Program says there have been no asteroids or comets observed that would impact Earth anytime in the foreseeable future.  All known Potentially Hazardous Asteroids have less than a 0.01% chance of impacting Earth in the next 100 years.

 

The Near-Earth Object office at JPL is a key group involved with the international collaboration of astronomers and scientists who keep watch on the sky with their telescopes, looking for asteroids that could do harm to our planet and predicting their paths through space for the foreseeable future. If there were any observations on anything headed our way, Chodas and his colleagues would know about it.

 

"If there were any object large enough to do that type of destruction in September, we would have seen something of it by now," he stated.

 

Another thing Chodas and his team do know -- this isn't the first time a wild, unsubstantiated claim of a celestial object about to impact Earth has been made, and unfortunately, it probably won’t be the last.  It seems to be a perennial favorite of the World Wide Web. 

 

In 2011 there were rumors about the so-called “doomsday” comet Elenin, which never posed any danger of harming Earth and broke up into a stream of small debris out in space. Then there were Internet assertions surrounding the end of the Mayan calendar on Dec. 21, 2012, insisting the world would end with a large asteroid impact. And just this year, asteroids 2004 BL86 and 2014 YB35 were said to be on dangerous near-Earth trajectories, but their flybys of our planet in January and March went without incident -- just as NASA said they would.

 

"Again, there is no existing evidence that an asteroid or any other celestial object is on a trajectory that will impact Earth," said Chodas. "In fact, not a single one of the known objects has any credible chance of hitting our planet over the next century."

 

NASA detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets passing 30 million miles of Earth using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes the physical nature of a subset of them, and predicts their paths to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet. There are no known credible impact threats to date -- only the continuous and harmless infall of meteoroids, tiny asteroids that burn up in the atmosphere.

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather