01/13/2018

Variety Pack: Friday's Snow Totals

While it wasn't a snow we will probably remember in a few years, it was a noteworthy event, because it was the first solid showing we have seen in about two years! For some, like the kiddos below, that is really something! :) 

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Or how about this cute DUCK?! I suspect he or she is also loving the snow in Henryville, IN! 

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And the sun is going to be back today! Grab the shades! It is going to be bright with that reflective snow! 
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All of the snow totals provided in this blog (besides pictures) are from the National Weather Service and its trained spotters across Kentuckiana.

I will say, what I have noticed from the reports and our viewer's comments online, is not everyone was treated the same. There is a wide variety of snow totals per county and city. Some are citing much higher amounts and some much lower.

 For example, E-town: I have heard huge ranges. Everything from less than 1'' to 5''! As seen below with this photo from Tosha Romans!

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SNOW TOTALS: 

REGIONALLY: Total Snow on the ground at 7 am in inches: 

Lexington (Official): 2
Louisville International (Official): 1
Louisville NWS Office: 2
Fort Knox: 3
Bowling Green (Official): 3

 What will go down in the books for Louisville is 1.3''. We have only seen 1.6'' for the year. Normally we see 12.5'' for the entire season. We have work to do! 

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COUNTY:

Next up, county ranges! Again, the following reports are from the NWS. They are unofficial and represent a range of all the reports received from that county at 7 am this morning and are reported in inches. 

South Central Indiana

Dubois: 3 to 5
Orange: 3
Crawford: 3 to 4
Perry: 4 to 5
Harrison: 2

North Central Kentucky

Jefferson: 1 to 2
Oldham: 2
Spencer: 1 to 2
Bullitt: 2 to 3
Hardin: 2 to 3
Meade: 2 to 3
Breckinridge: 2 to 3
Nelson: 2 to 3
Larue: 2 to 3

East Central Kentucky

Franklin: 3
Fayette: 1 to 2
Mercer: 2 to 3
Jessamine: 1
Clark: 1
Madison: 1

South Central Kentucky

Casey: 2 to 3
Butler: 3 to 4
Barren: 2
Warren: 3 to 4
Allen: 1

CITY:

We can break this down into a few cities now.  Observations were collected from a variety of sources at varying times, as well as equipment and exposures. Not all data listed are considered official. 

Location/ Amount/ Time
Cloverport: 5.5 at 955 PM 
Paoli: 5.0 at 900 PM 
Tell City: 5.0 at 856 PM 
Beda: 4.3 at 905 PM 
Aberdeen: 3.9 at 1015 PM 
Shepherdsville: 3.5 at 1030 PM 
Brooks: 3.5 at 955 PM 
Leitchfield: 3.4 at 835 PM  

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Lawrenceburg: 3.0 at 1030 PM 
Liberty: 3.0 at 1030 PM 
Bowling Green: 2.9 at 1030 PM 
Middletown: 2.5 at 955 PM 
Russellville: 2.5 at 855 PM 
Valley Station: 2.5 at 945 PM  
Rich Pond: 2.3 at 905 PM  
Shively: 2.0 at 1010 PM 
Saint Joseph: 2.0 at 945 PM
Lawrenceburg: 2.0 at 910 PM  
Shepherdsville: 2.0 at 845 PM  
Bardstown: 1.5 at 950 PM  

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Alton: 1.5 at 916 PM  
Pewee Valley: 1.5 at 840 PM
Elizabethtown: 1.1 at 955 PM 
Charlestown: 1.0 at 1020 PM 
Akersville: 1.0 at 1020 PM 
Fern Creek: 1.0 at 1005 PM  
La Grange: 1.0 at 850 PM 
Liberty: 0.5 at 940 PM

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Didn't find your city, county or something nearby? You can find more storm reports from the National Weather Service here!

Or did you see something different than what was reported by the NWS? Let me know on social media! The links to my pages are below! 

Katie McGraw's Facebook Page

Katie McGraw's Twitter Page

-Katie McGraw 

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01/12/2018

NOWCAST: Transition from Rain to Mix to Snow ...Happening Now!

Believe it or not... forecast is right on track! The progression from rain to wintry mix to snow has happened sllloowwwyy over the last 12 hours and will continue for the next 12 hours. By this evening it will be all snow for everyone. 

At one am, temps were in the upper 50s and low 60s and widespread rain was moving through. 

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But from 4-6 am, temps dropped dramatically. Check out this drop in TWO HOURS! Nearly 20 degrees! 

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And the precipitation type responded during that time. The radar was lit up like a Christmas tree for a few hours. 

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By the early afternoon, freezing rain, started to change over to sleet and snow in our western counties and that snow will be pushing east over the next few hours. 
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Ice accumulation has been pretty substantial. We could see a quarter inch of ice. Our own Marc Weinberg took these photos of trees downtown. When trees get weighed down, along with increasing winds, some could be knocked down. Power outages are not out of the question. 

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When you look at the regular radar, which is known as reflectivity, it will show you all snow. But when we look at something known as correlated coefficient, we are able to pick out particles that are not uniform, like sleet. Notice counties just to the west (just before 2) were seeing sleet, but it is all snow behind that. 

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Snow will infiltrate in slowly over the next few hours, again from west to east. Roads will be deteriorating at this time. But some of you are probably still not seeing snow...

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However, by this evening, that will change! Everyone will see the final transition. Snow will be accumulating. At this point our western counties have been seeing snow for a few hours. 

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The evening commute could be a tricky one. Stay calm and go slow! Temps will continue to fall as well, once the sun sets. Lows will be in the upper teens tonight. 

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By tonight, snow will slowly start to exit our western counties. 
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Around 12-2 am, snow will exit the metro area. 

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And it's all over by 3-5 am. But again, MUCH COLDER! 
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HOW MUCH SNOW? 

The money graphic.

I think everyone is good for 1-3'' of snow. The least amount of snow is likely to be in our SE counties. There is likely to be a band of higher totals, in the blue, of 2-4''. A few isolated higher amounts are not out of the question.  
AT 1

Stay tuned for the latest information. Be sure to join Marc, Rick and I for a special edition of WDRB News this evening. We will be on air for 4-7 pm straight tonight. The whole WDRB Weather Team has their eyes on this system because of the potential negative impacts to the roads. We will be updating all of our social media pages as well. The links to my social media pages are below. 

Katie McGraw's Facebook Page

Katie McGraw's Twitter Page

-Katie McGraw 

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01/11/2018

ICE & SNOW: Timing Out When We Transition From Rain, To Freezing Rain, Then Sleet And Snow...

WINTER STORM WARNINGS and WINTER WEATHER ADVISORIES go into effect early Friday morning for all of our area. It's the first WINTER STORM WARNING we've seen in 695 days for the Louisville area. As temperatures fall on Friday, precipitation types will change from liquid to frozen. Let's start with 3 AM Friday when rain could get heavy at times... 

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At 6 AM, it should be plain rain in Louisville and points east. West of I-65 is where you need to watch our for icy conditions developing as freezing rain takes over...

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Between 9 and 10 AM, that transition to freezing rain begins in Louisville. It will take some time for conditions to deteriorate, but as soon as you see a glaze on elevated surfaces, that should tell you the roads will shortly follow...

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At noon, most of our area is dealing with freezing rain. Ice could add up to a couple tenths of an inch on trees and power lines. This wouldn't lead to widespread, crippling power outages, but some are certainly possible as winds gust over 30 mph...

4

Around 3 to 4 PM we quickly go from sleet to snow in the city. Don't forget, these flakes fall on top of a layer of ice. If traveling, this invisible threat will make the evening commute very dangerous... 

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Snow continues through the evening hours. As time wears on, it gets even colder so the snow will go from big, fat, wet flakes to the dry, fine, powdery stuff...  

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That means the snowfall ratios end up getting higher than the traditional 10:1. What does that mean? One inch of liquid would equate to 10 inches of snow. There won't be that much liquid left, but this will add to the snow totals...

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Finally, the snow showers and flurries pull away early Saturday morning. With temperatures in the teens, everything that fell will be frozen solid. Treating the roads is going to be tough due to Friday's rain, so please travel with caution... 

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During the afternoon on Friday, travel conditions will become hazardous and it will only get worse as the day wears on. Marc and I will be on WDRB News tonight at 10 & 11 to let you know HOW MUCH ice and snow to expect. Many schools and businesses have already closed and we anticipate more to come. Stay with WDRB for the latest info and our entire weather team will be here each step of the way. Please be careful!  

 

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

WINTER STORM WARNING: Timing, Totals & Impacts

The National Weather Service in Louisville has issued a winter storm warning for most of our viewing area. It includes Louisville.  The warning goes into effect on Friday morning at 4 am EST and will continue until Saturday at 1 am EST.

Below is an image of the counties included in the warning as well as detailed information from the National Weather Service.

WINTER STORM WARNING INFORMATION:

Warnings

..WINTER STORM TO AFFECT MUCH OF SOUTHERN INDIANA AND CENTRAL
KENTUCKY FRIDAY and Friday night...

.Rain will change to freezing rain from west to east on Friday,
and then change to accumulating snow by late Friday afternoon.
The combination of ice and snow accumulations will result in
hazardous travel Friday and Friday night.

Cities and Counties included: 

Orange-Washington-Scott-Jefferson-Dubois-Crawford-Perry-Harrison-
Floyd-Clark-Hancock-Breckinridge-Meade-Ohio-Grayson-Hardin-
Bullitt-Oldham-Trimble-Henry-Shelby-Spencer-Nelson-Larue-Butler-
Edmonson-Hart-Logan-Warren-Simpson-Allen-Barren-
Including the cities of Paoli, Salem, Scottsburg, Madison,
Jasper, English, Tell City, Corydon, New Albany, Jeffersonville,
Lewisport, Hawesville, Hardinsburg, Brandenburg, Hartford,
Leitchfield, Elizabethtown, Shepherdsville, Louisville,
La Grange, Bedford, Milton, New Castle, Shelbyville,
Taylorsville, Bardstown, Hodgenville, Morgantown, Brownsville,
Horse Cave, Russellville, Bowling Green, Franklin, Providence,
Scottsville, and Glasgow

* WHAT...Up to a quarter inch of ice by Friday afternoon. Tree
damage and power outages possible. Two to four inches of snow
Friday afternoon and evening, with locally higher amounts.
Travel will become hazardous by early afternoon.

* WHERE...Portions of southern Indiana and central Kentucky,
mainly along and west of Interstate 65.

* WHEN...4 AM Friday to 1 AM Saturday.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Be prepared for significant reductions in
visibility at times.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Winter Storm Warning means significant amounts of snow, sleet
and ice are expected. This will make travel very hazardous or
impossible. The latest road conditions for the state you are
calling from can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Stay tuned for the latest information. The widespread rain is likely to move through the area tonight and will transition to freezing rain or sleet overnight and early tomorrow morning. Snow will follow during the day on Friday. Be sure to join Marc and Rick on WDRB News this evening. They will continue to make tweaks to the forecast. The whole WDRB Weather Team has their eyes on this system because of the potential negative impacts to the roads. We will be updating all of our social media pages over the next two days. The links to my social media pages are below. 

Katie McGraw's Facebook Page

Katie McGraw's Twitter Page

-Katie McGraw 

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NWS Hosts Conference Call Concerning Winter Storm

The National Weather Service in Louisville has concluded a conference call with local emergency managers and media concerning a winter storm that will start late tonight as rain and continue through Saturday morning as snow. There will be a change from rain to freezing rain to snow throughout the day tomorrow. This storm is likely to include snow and ice accumulation as well as slick, icy and snow covered roads for Friday's commutes. 

Below are a couple graphics summarizing the discussion. 

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Marc, Rick and I are all here watching the latest data roll in. Be sure to watch the news this evening on WDRB for the latest information about timing and impacts as the system approaches our area.  Jude will also be here early tomorrow morning, as precip changes from rain to wintry mix. I will be here for the midday as the change happens from a wintry mix to snow. The entire WDRB Weather Team is keeping a pulse on this storm and we will also be updating all of our social media pages over the next few days. The links to my social media pages are below. 

Katie McGraw's Facebook Page

Katie McGraw's Twitter Page

-Katie McGraw 

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Winter Storm Watch Update

From Jude Redfield

    We now have a winter storm watch for all of Kentuckiana. This is for Friday & Friday night. This could be upgraded to a winter storm warning by tonight. Please see the graphics below that outline the time table for our change from rain to ice to snow. I have a detailed snow accumulation map on WDRB In The Morning.

Temps

Snow Reports

Specialgraphic

TempPlunge

Stormview

 

01/10/2018

Storm system wreaks havoc on U.S. as it moves across the country

Heavy rain sent rivers of mud and debris through Southern California neighborhoods, just weeks after deadly wildfires scorched the area. The death toll has climbed to 15 today, after devastating mudslides. Dozens more are missing and many are feared to be dead and buried in the mud. 

To make a debris flow, you less than half an inch of rain per hour falling on a burn scar.  More than 1.5'' of rain fell per hour. At one point, Montecito, CA got more than a half-inch of rain in FIVE MINUTES. It prompted dozens of rescues and firefighters are working tirelessly to rescue more people who are trapped. 

One rescue happened while the cameras were rolling in Montecito. A 14 year old girl was rescued by The Santa Barbara County Fire Department. Her home had been destroyed and she had spent hours waiting for help. The video below shows the moment she emerged from the mud and wreckage. 

Video Credit: NBC News

The storm is over now for California, but continues to push east. During the day on Tuesday. Las Vegas saw 1.33” of rain. That is their 6th wettest calendar day on record. The heavy rain and low visibility likely led this wreck on a Las Vegas highway involving two semis. It was also caught on camera. Watch below. 

Video credit: Junwyn Agustin

This same system is progressing SE to Texas and will eventually lift north and head toward the Ohio River Valley. This storm is already making headlines and is also getting a lot of buzz in Kentuckiana. A winter storm watch has already been issued. To hear about the latest forecast for wintry weather, be sure to join us on WDRB News this evening with Marc and Rick. There is also an updated blog you can check it out here. 

Katie McGraw's Facebook Page

Katie McGraw's Twitter Page

-Katie McGraw 

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Winter Storm Watch for Friday

There is a Winter Storm Watch in effect Friday for the majority of our WDRB counties. This was issued because we expect ice accumulation during the day followed by snow accumulation in many places by nightfall.  You'll find the text from the Watch issued by the Louisville NWS office below. 

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...WINTER STORM WATCH IN EFFECT FROM FRIDAY MORNING THROUGH LATE
FRIDAY NIGHT...

* WHAT...Mixed precipitation will create difficult travel
conditions. Total snow accumulations of 2 to 4 inches and ice
accumulations up to a quarter inch possible.

* WHERE...Portions of southern Indiana and central Kentucky,
roughly along and west of the I-65 corridor.

* WHEN...From Friday morning through late Friday night.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Reduced visibilities, especially during the
most intense snow.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Winter Storm Watch means there is potential for significant
snow, sleet or ice accumulations that may impact travel. Continue
to monitor the latest forecasts.

Winter weather is looking very likely Friday and Saturday, and this whole system will come down to timing.  This will actually start as scattered rain Thursday with temperatures topping out in the 60s!! Obviously there's no threat of winter weather until the incoming cold front drops our temperatures. 

  AT 1

That temperature drop will determine our transition from rain to sleet/freezing rain and eventually to snow.  That first transition from plain rain to an icy mix looks to happen right around daybreak Friday. 

AT 2

The transition starts northwest of Louisville around 7 AM, but areas southeast of Louisville won't see that transition to freezing rain until early afternoon.  Louisville will likely see the transition around 10 or 11 AM. 

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The Friday morning commute will be wet, but it shouldn't be icy yet.  Our recent warm-up brought pavement temps above freezing.  While temperatures Friday into Saturday will fall far enough to cause freezing, it won't happen right away. 

  AT 3

Freezing rain will continue through the day with ice accumulation around a quarter of an inch possible.  Then the transition to snow starts by late afternoon.

AT 4

This means the evening commute Friday could get slick as could any Saturday morning travel.  It's tough to treat roads while rain and freezing rain are falling but becomes a little easier once we transition to snow.  That snow transition happens after 4 PM and snow will continue to fall through early Saturday. A couple inches of accumulated snow is possible, but how much will all depend on how quickly and how far temperatures drop.

AT 5

With the threat of ice accumulation, we need to talk about power outages.  Ice building up on power lines can cause outages as can ice accumulating on tree branches that then snap.  I suggest planning ahead in case of an outage by charging your phone and replacing batteries in appliances you will need.  Temperatures don't climb above freezing any time soon, so melting will be very slow. 

Marc and Rick will be explaining the timing and impacts tonight on WDRB News, and we will continue to provide updates this week on the blog, on social media, and on TV. 

Hannah's Facebook Page

Hannah's Twitter Page

-Hannah Strong

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01/09/2018

SNOW POTENTIAL: Locations Where Accumulating Snow Is Possible...

We are still on track to see a major winter storm in the Ohio Valley later this week. There is disagreement between the computer models at this point, so giving you numbers would be irresponsible. However, it does look like snow and ice will become a concern for many of us. Rain begins late Thursday, becomes heavy at times on Friday before changing over to freezing rain, sleet, and then snow overnight. The GFS shows greater ice potential west of I-65, with some snow on the backside...

4

2

On the other hand, the EURO has less of an ice threat and more in the way of snow. If you've been praying for snow this winter, then this is the model you are cheering for. Both models show the low running along the spine of the Appalachians. This is a classic track that produces wintry weather for our area. Due to the lack of agreement in the amount of precipitation, this one needs to be watched closely. When all is said and done, there could be considerable differences in accumulations of snow and ice in our area...

3

1

While I think everyone could see snow Friday night into Saturday, southern Indiana certainly has the better chance at accumulations worthy of a shovel. The way things look now, travel conditions will quickly deteriorate Friday night into Saturday. Heavy rain on the front end of the storm will wash away any brine or salt. As temperatures tank, everything that falls will be frozen solid by Saturday morning. Please check back with us for updates all week and don't forget to catch Marc and I on WDRB News at 10 & 11! 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather

01/08/2018

SIGNIFICANT STORM Later This Week! Temperature & Precipitation Discussion...

Get ready for some wild weather as a significant storm moves in later this week. After spending nearly 2 weeks at or below 32 degrees, we finally had a chance to thaw out the past couple days and numbers will get even higher. South breezes kick up midweek allowing temperatures to surge into the 60's on Thursday...

2

Before you start looking for your shorts, it's not going to last long. A monster front plows into our area Friday sending us back into the freezer by the weekend. High temperatures won't escape the twenties Saturday and the winds will make it feel even colder... 

3

If you've lived in the Ohio Valley long enough, you're no stranger to the "loose cannon" weather patterns. As colder air rushes in on the backside of the storm, we could see a transition from heavy rain to wet snow Friday night. With the Gulf of Mexico open for business, there's a ton of moisture for this storm to work with. The GFS and EURO both shows around 2" of liquid...

1

Exactly when we transition from rain to snow will determine how much we get. At this point, accumulations are certainly possible regionally. It's still way to far out to give any specifics, but no matter what falls from the sky, it will be frozen solid by Saturday morning. Marc and I will be on WDRB at 10 and 11 with an update! 

 

 

 

-Rick DeLuca

Rick

https://www.facebook.com/RickDeLucaWeather